>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.5 - Expert Level

Florian Hardwig's picture

This is how it works:

  • A portion of a glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the glyph and the typeface. To win, you need to name at least:
    1. typeface
    2. weight
    3. character/glyph
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge – a portion of a glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 × 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can’t win the next game.

In case of any disputes, Mr Bald Condensed or me will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz or Intermediary Level Type ID Pop Quiz first.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Here’s another hint. The font in question sports a rather unusual female glyph (and I’m not talking about the ordinal).

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I should have written “right away” instead of “right ahead”, btw. Please forgive my lousy English.

eliason's picture

Is it Fondo?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I think it’s time for another hint:
This family of fonts has more than one display cut.

typovar's picture

Sunday afternoon, outside it's too hot to hang out…

Why not play along in a game out Typophillic-expert-level-quizing?

typovar's picture

It could be Leksa, but the bar doesn't cross the l… No, it's not.

A strange female-sign indeed:

typovar's picture

Internet is really slow today. Must be the heat.
No further answers right now, sorry.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

And it’s not drawn by someone from America. Sorry, it’s not it.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

A summary:

• It is a fl ligature
• It’s creator is american, but not from the US.
• The font in question sports a rather unusual female glyph (and I’m not talking about the ordinal).
• The family of fonts have more than one display cut.

And a new hint:

• Another typeface by the same designer was drawn as a corporate typeface for a european city.

eliason's picture

Is it PampaType's Arlt?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

ooo, close

eliason's picture

Rayuela? No, that's not it.

eliason's picture

Borges Titulo Blanca!

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Yes! Borges Titulo Blanca it is.

eliason's picture

So what's the female glyph?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

The cow.

eliason's picture

Okay, here's the next one. Not so über as the last, I think!

John Lyttle's picture

Is it a c?

eliason's picture

Yes it is.

eliason's picture

Nope.

eliason's picture

There you go! It's actually the regular width and the black weight, but my cropping probably makes that next to impossible to divine, so I'm going to call that a win for John.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Does this mean I can guess again? (If I promise to take it easy with the überness if I happen to guess right.)

Florian Hardwig's picture

John, impressive! Congratulations.
Frode, yes, you can participate in this round.

John Lyttle's picture

Here’s a new glyph portion.

John Lyttle's picture

The designer in question is not Nick Shinn this time, but he is someone (like Mr. Shinn — and myself, for that matter) who came from a European nation and has made Canada his home.

sim's picture

I would say that's a w.

John Lyttle's picture

It's a W.

John Lyttle's picture

Typophile readers may be more familiar with this type designer's scripts and his contributions to discussions on this site about a certain Estonian calligrapher.

eliason's picture

Ooh I know it now.

John Lyttle's picture

Yeah, I usually give away too much in the hints.

typovar's picture

Looks more like Air Italia ?

John Lyttle's picture

I’m not sure I understand your question about Air Italia, Arjen. I suspect you’re barking up the wrong tree.

sim's picture

Is the type designer could be Anton Koovit

John Lyttle's picture

No, I’m afraid he couldn’t be Anton Koovit (although my understanding of quantum physics is sketchy).

Another hint: this typeface was released in 1991, according to Identifont.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

This is Lineale by Gérard Mariscalchi, and according to his website it was designed in 1997.

John Lyttle's picture

Yes, you are right again, Frode (on both counts). Your turn.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Hint: The family has a rather geographic(al) name.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

It’s designer is from the Czech Republic.

Florian Hardwig's picture

It’s not Vida (21 Italic), is it?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

You are VERY close!

Florian Hardwig's picture

I don’t get the ‘geographic(al) name’ hint … is it from the Vida family?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

The Vida family is called Evropa (on the front page). Anyway, you were right, only not with the weight. It’s Evropa Vida 32 Italic.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Ah, I see. Evropa seems to be a special package, containing a few styles of two families, with enhanced language support:
Vida and Politic B, enriched by Greek and Cyrillics, have been adapted for the purposes of Czech Presidency of EU.

And I was pondering on what Vidå/Danmark, or Vida/Oregon might have to do with this!
Off to prepare a new challenge …

Florian Hardwig's picture

Here you go, experts!

eliason's picture

Looks like a /W/ or /w/ from Banjoman Open Bold, flipped horizontally.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Not bad – yes, it is a ‘W’. But as flipping, rotating, squooshing etc. is not allowed, the answer is: no, not Banjoman.

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