>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.5 - Expert Level

Florian Hardwig's picture

This is how it works:

  • A portion of a glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the glyph and the typeface. To win, you need to name at least:
    1. typeface
    2. weight
    3. character/glyph
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge – a portion of a glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 × 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can’t win the next game.

In case of any disputes, Mr Bald Condensed or me will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz or Intermediary Level Type ID Pop Quiz first.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Florian Hardwig's picture

This typeface has been named after a place. If you travel from the designer’s home to the city where the foundry is based, this place will be more or less on your way – a bit closer to the latter. For a 1,400 km distance, one would usually take a plane, admittedly.

Florian Hardwig's picture

I’ll zoom out a bit.

This font is available from FontShop, but not from MyFonts.

riccard0's picture

Mmm... Not among the 591 results for "inline", nor in their "multilinear" fontlist...
And sure the direction of the inner stroke is strange...
By the way, it reminds me of the VW logo ;-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

It is featured in the ‘inline’ FontLists. Only, this is an alternate glyph (I know, I know, this is mean – sorry. But this is the Expert level, after all!). The distance from the place after which this typeface has been named to the home of Volkswagen is 75 miles.

riccard0's picture

I suppose it could/should be Dessau Plakat.
But I'm unable to find the right glyph.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Oh dear, you are right. It doesn’t appear in FontShop’s character set. I’m sorry that I didn’t check that before. Yes, it is Dessau Plakat, designed by Gábor Kóthay from Hungary, released with Fountain in Malmö, Sweden. I can assure you that this ‘W’ is included in my font file – even twice!


It was not my intention to make this extra difficult. Glad you nevertheless found the correct answer. Well deserved, your turn!

riccard0's picture

Oh, well, no problem! :-)
While I’m looking for something to post, I should mention that the name of the font is an obvious reference to the second city where the Bauhaus moved in 1925 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhaus#Dessau).

riccard0's picture

It's not an inline typeface.

eliason's picture

Is this an @?

riccard0's picture

It's not an @ either.

eliason's picture

S?

riccard0's picture

Not a S, sorry.

eliason's picture

e?

riccard0's picture

Mmm... no.

riccard0's picture

Here's another slightly moved and zoomed out crop of the same glyph:

riccard0's picture

The name of the font is the name of a fruit.

eliason's picture

Thought it might be Tomate, but that doesn't have any verticals like this.

riccard0's picture

Well, while the tomato is native to South America, it is now often regarded as a typical mediterranean produce. The fruit after which the font shown here is named truly is a typical and original mediterranean product.

eliason's picture

Looking through the /g/s and /9/s from different weights and versions of Antique Olive, but the curves don't match.

riccard0's picture

That's just because the glyph is neither a g nor a 9... ;-)

eliason's picture

Ah, Antique Olive bold /i/?

eliason's picture

Or Roman, or Black; I can't tell.

riccard0's picture

The first one (Roger Excoffon’s Antique Olive Bold) is the winner! :-)
I’m sorry (almost ;-) for the malicious crop.
Congratulations and please, your turn.

eliason's picture

That was a clever crop. Here's a new one:

eliason's picture

As it happens, I can't really answer that with a yes or no...

riccard0's picture

Mmm… I suspect why, but I can’t say nothing.

eliason's picture

Nope.

eliason's picture

You were closer the first time.

eliason's picture

Yes!

eliason's picture

This is a recent font design by a young American designer - his first professional release, I believe.

eliason's picture

In this Massachusetts designer's most recent release, he exagerrated the most prominent feature of this mystery font much further.

Jan's picture

Trilby by David Jonathan Ross?
The most recent release with the exagerrated most prominent feature being Manicotti?

eliason's picture

Winner!


Ross's 2009 Trilby has slab serifs with exaggerated weight; his Manicotti takes that playfulness to the extreme.
You're up, Jan.

Jan's picture

Thanks.
Here we (the few of us) go:

Florian Hardwig's picture

That looks like an interesting counter! At the moment, I have no idea. Maybe a ‘k’?

Jan's picture

It’s not from a recently released typeface.
It’s not an obscure glyph.
It’s not a ‘k’.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Oblique a?

Jan's picture

Nope.

Florian Hardwig's picture

A figure, perhaps?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

It could also be an R or a B.

Jan's picture

A figure, yes.

Jan's picture

Yes.

Jan's picture

Nope.
It’s not a script.

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