Newsletter 4

It’s been a long, arduous road back, but we hope you’re as excited as we are!

So what’s the new Typophile all about?

First and foremost, all the archives have been preserved and we’ve even worked hard to ensure that URLs have remained as consistent as possible. You’ll find old Forums content now grouped under an appropriate Community.

Newsletter Test 3

It's been a long, arduous road back, but we hope you're as excited as we are!

So what's the new Typophile all about?

First and foremost, all the archives have been preserved and we've even worked hard to ensure that URLs have remained as consistent as possible. You'll find old Forums content now grouped under an appropriate Community.

Test Newsletter 2

It's been a long, arduous road back, but we hope you're as excited as we are!

So what's the new Typophile all about?

First and foremost, all the archives have been preserved and we've even worked hard to ensure that URLs have remained as consistent as possible. You'll find old Forums content now grouped under an appropriate Community.

Peter Pan music titles

I’ve been re-setting the original ca. 1904 score to Peter Pan as found at ‹https://books.google.com/books?id=J-wQAAAAYAAJ›, which has been a fun exercise in LilyPond, but I’m curious about the font used on the title page and as song titles though the book. (Apparently I’m “not authorized” to attach a sample image. ☹) The usual type ID sites don’t recognize this, which makes me wonder whether it has ever been digitized. Does this look familiar to anyone here?

Pointed serif, similar to Serpentine

I'm trying to identify this sample – I am confident it originated from a font as it was created by a printer. They wouldn't have gone to such lengths to create custom letterforms for this small job. Unfortunately the printers are no longer trading (Defasio, Bradford on Avon, near Bath).

The sample can be viewed here: http://www.winterdesign.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/IMG_1910.jpg

If this can be identified I'll be so pleased!

Thanks in advance.

Study Reveals Fonts That Win Elections

Forums: 

WOBURN, Mass., April 1, 2012 – Monotype Imaging Inc. today http://announced the results of a 22-year study into font choices used by political campaigns throughout the United States. Originally started by Monotype in 1990 in conjunction with the South Henrietta Institute of Technology, the exhaustive study analyzed the fonts used in more than 314,169 .U.S. municipal and state elections, with the goal of identifying fonts and typographic trends in the winning political campaigns. Visit Slideshare presetation here: http://tinyurl.com/cjr3uxf

How to keep my type mine if I work at a studio/agency

(I ran a search but didn’t find anything. If it has been covered, apologies in advance, please direct me to the relevant thread and ditch this one.)

Not sure I sufficiently summed up my question in the subject line...

I’ve been noodling around with type for a long time. Took a long break. Now I’m getting back into it again.

I have no interest in selling my type commercially - as if it’s even good enough. I just want to use it in my own work, and hopefully it’s something of a selling point if I look for a job with someone. Unique type that no one else has. I figure it has more worth that way.

Body text point sizes: whole increments or in between?

A question I've never directly posed, waiting for the answer to become apparent over time (still a relative newcomer), is whether there are conventions regarding body text sizing in whole or perhaps half point size increments? In book layouts, I often find myself using the work of others as a template, and the point size of the body sometimes appears to be in half increments or even something odder than quarter point size increments. Do my eyes deceive, and do most designers/typsetters adhere to standardized sizings for body text (10, 11, 12 pt)? At present, I'm tempted to set something in 11.25 Dante MT.