Curious sample of 'Louvaine' from Solotype Catalog - any matches?

mvor's picture

Hello! Found this example on p136 of the Solotype catalog.

According to the Solopedia - http://abfonts.freehostia.com/solopedia/solopedia-l.htm - this font is a match for something called 'Bulldog' I cant find this anywhere, wondering if anyone had another similar typeface?

As always, may thanks for any assistance...

M

oldnick's picture

Similar in some ways, quite different in others...
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/nicksfonts/savoy-roman-nf/

mvor's picture

similar indeed... but not quite!

bojev's picture

Morris Fuller Benton designed a font called Louvaine for ATF in 1929 - three weights plus an italic but I can not find a specimen or sample to see if this is it - not in my ATF catalogs from the 30s of 40s. The Bulldog font I have seen is also close but is much heavier and only close.

idiotcountry's picture

I believe the Solopedia reference is to the Bulldog Foundry - Pat & Paul Hickson. There is a listing for
Louvaine Bold and Louvaine Eclaire on their UK-based digital distributor's website.

http://www.fontshop.co.uk/preview/P00021999.gif

Pretty sure all the Bulldog fonts are just redrawn Solotype materials without the credit (and the Solotype often being reproduced from other entity, but that's a different story).

donshottype's picture

Louvaine is shown in Jaspert's Enclyopedia of Typefaces, 1970 ed., with the three weights. The letter-forms match the Solocat image. The weight of the strokes and serifs for all three is a little lighter than shown in the Solocat image. Jaspert was unable to find a full character set for any of the three.
As for the Solocat entry, the relative thickness is explained by the source. Dan X. Solo scoured the U.S. for used typefaces. The impression of such typefaces could be expected to be heavier than the carefully controlled impression of new type in a foundry's specimen, or even for the material provided to Jaspert.
Don

bojev's picture

Great lead Don, Full sample character sets are shown in "American Metal Typefaces of the 20th Century" by Mac McGrew, Oak Knoll Books 1993 - The font was designed in 1928 and issued in 1929 but did not last long enough to appear in the 1934 ATF catalog. The Bulldog Foundry version seems to be the only digital one.

donshottype's picture

More from Jaspert: "...designed by M.F. Benton, based on a Bodoni model, but with the peculiarity found in a number of modernistic types of making the thicks and thins meet at an angle. This is especially noticeable in the O and the S. The g and y have cursive tails. The italic is the roman inclined, except for a, which has a flat-foot serif, v and w. There are three weights, the light being the colour of a normal book type."
Don

donshottype's picture

Christian Schwartz liked the design of Louvaine. See Empire State Building.
Don

hrant's picture

Wow, some of those forms are very 21st century!

hhp

donshottype's picture

McGrew: "LOUVAINE series was designed by Morris F. Benton for ATF in 1928. It is an adaptation of Bodoni (the working title was Modern Bodoni), and many of the characters are identical. Only g and y are basically different; otherwise the distinction is in the more abrupt transition from thick to thin strokes in this series. In this respect, Ultra Bodoni has more affinity to Louvaine than to the other Bodoni weights. The three weights of Louvaine correspond to Bodoni Book, regular, and Bold. This series did not last long enough to appear in the 1934 ATF specimen book, the next complete one after its introduction. "
Yes, McGrew has full character sets.
Don

donshottype's picture

Interesting to apply McGrew's comment to the ATF Bodoni as digitized by Adobe, and Bitstream.
Don

mvor's picture

Wow - woke up this morning and pleased to see a really interesting set of references and samples. Will certainly get hold of "American Metal Typefaces of the 20th Century" and check it out in more detail, might be worth reanimating if the right project comes along...

many thanks...

donshottype's picture

You're welcome.
McGrew's book is #1 for ID of 2oth cent. American metal type.
Don

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