USING A FONT COMMERCIALLY

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emma overeem's picture
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Joined: 17 Jul 2013 - 6:58am
USING A FONT COMMERCIALLY
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Hi.
New to this forum and I'm hoping someone will be able to bestow their wisdom... failing that I'm trawling for hours for the answer on google and it'll make me cry with frustration!

So I'd like to create a series of posters. These posters use a font as it's focus – word play on a font for the purpose of creating an amusing poster. I aim to sell the posters. Can I do this? Clearly I'll need to license said font to use it on my mac, but then after that I'm unclear as to the ramifications.... i.e. commercial gain of using a font to my advantage.

The posters would only appeal to designs really, as designers more familiar with fonts/typefaces.

HELP!!!!

Thank you :)

Nick Curtis's picture
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Joined: 21 Apr 2005 - 8:16am
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My EULA allows such use and, in fact, I encourage such use: I like to think of my fonts as working tools for working professionals…

Theunis de Jong's picture
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Joined: 22 Apr 2008 - 5:06pm
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.. use a font as it's focus ..

Unless your being ironic, its going to be worth paying attention to you're grammar when your going to sell these.

emma overeem's picture
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Joined: 17 Jul 2013 - 6:58am
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yeah theunis...at work and multi-tasking...nothing going to print yet :)

Rainer Zerenko's picture
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Joined: 15 Mar 2006 - 6:28am
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»your grammar« »you’re going« … you are one evil jester … ;)

Rainer Zerenko's picture
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Joined: 15 Mar 2006 - 6:28am
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@ Emma, each font has its own licence. So if you'd like to have advice you should tell us which font you’d want to use. Generally, if you buy a font from a professional vendor, you have the right to use it commercially. But be very careful by using fonts which you have downloaded »for free« somewhere. Some/many of these fonts are illegal knock-offs.

UPDATE: Sorry, read your posting wrong. So don’t mind.

James Michaels's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2010 - 12:54am
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Like Renko said, you should read the license. But if it's a professional font that you purchased, it's almost certain that the license allows commercial use, otherwise professional designers wouldn't buy it as almost all their work is commercial.

emma overeem's picture
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Joined: 17 Jul 2013 - 6:58am
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Hi, thanks so far! I added this post to 'Release' section too and made an additional comment:

to clarify a bit more... I'd be using the name of the font/typeface in a phrase..and setting that phrase in the font/typeface I am referencing... so for example 'Frutiger Salad' then doing an illustration of a salad bowl using letters as fruit (all set in Frutiger)...

Make sense...?!! Produced via screenprinting.

Sorry!

emma overeem's picture
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Joined: 17 Jul 2013 - 6:58am
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um, fruit bowl... (yes at work and multi-tasking)

James Montalbano's picture
Joined: 18 Jun 2003 - 11:00am
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Be careful here with the use of the word "Commercial".

Generally, and IANAL, in End User License Agreements, the general terms for license are "Business and Personal use". This covers what most users expect, the ability to use the font software to create documents of various kinds; correspondences, advertisements, publications, posters etc.

The term "Commercial" in an EULA generally means using the actual font software in a product that will be sold. Game, App, set-top box, etc. This usage is usually not allowed in a standard EULA and requires an additional license fee.