Huge

gregorycadars's picture

A new display typeface.
(I know that antialias exists, but I'm in love
with black & white)
I've got problems with this Lc "f", so if
you can help me with your precious consultings...

HUGE

jonathan's picture

I like it...even the "f".

The only thing I'd change is the "A". It's a little too jagged in relation to the other glyphs.

hrant's picture

Great presence.
And I also think the lc "f" is fine.
The only glyphs that bug me are
the Pilcrow and Section.

hhp

fonthausen's picture

I know this ment to be a pixel font, but it could be as wel a good starting point for a sansserif font...

I Like it.

Jacques

glutton's picture

If memory serves, I think the § (section) is the glyph we're supposed to replace with the Euro.

I heard that the § is some kind of universal currency symbol that no one uses.

gregorycadars's picture

Thank you all!

So I keep the "f" as it is...
I've tried a square "A" before but the triangular(and jagged) one still more legible.
Here's also an alternative ¶ and §.

§and¶

Jacques, concerning your idea, I've already draw some shapes...

Greg

fonthausen's picture

John; I am not sure if you are right. the § is not to be replaced. They talked about replacing the currency symbol. But they changed that since then. The § is used for example in law books.
The currency Symbol and the Euro sign should now be both in a typeface. The euro has become an xtra unicode number ($20AC) and it is an xtra glyph.

Jacques

kentlew's picture

The §ection §ymbol is used to refer to §ections. It often accompanies the ¶ilcrow, which is used to signify ¶aragraphs. Often used in reference to legal documents and some other scholarly works. Please don't replace it.

The character you're thinking of, John, is the generic currency symbol (dec 219), placed at shift-option-2 on the Mac keyboard. That's where you'll find the euro in many updated fonts; however, this placement is sometimes debated by those who feel there is a reason to keep the currency symbol. (You can find a discussion of this over on the ATypI list a couple months back.)

-- Kent.

glutton's picture

Aha!

fonthausen's picture

Kent, Just teasing: shift-option-2 on the American Keyboard!

Jacques

hrant's picture

Pop Quiz:
Which letter of the alphabet is the origin of the Pilcrow symbol?

The first correct answer gets a free paragraph.

hhp

kentlew's picture

Jacques --

Zut alors! Bien sur . . . Please forgive this myopic American.

Hrant --

I don't have the references at hand, but IIRC the pilcrow started out as a stylized C, from caesura. How 'bout it?

-- K.

Miss Tiffany's picture

oooh Hrant. You tease my mind. I am not sure as
to 'which letter', but it's history must have something
to do also with rubrication.

Rough definition of rubrication: the adding of the red
ink in manuscripts (also used during the incunable
period) to sections. Used to signify new paragraphs.
Although I don't think they had this term that early.

hrant's picture

Kent:
Not a caesura (which seems to be a mid-sentence thingie), but you got the letter correct, so here's your free paragraph:

According to Parkes's "Pause and Effect: An Introduction to the History of Punctuation in the West" (which it seems you returned to the library a bit too early :-), the pilcrow is a symbol for "paraph" (which can also be marked by a double-slash, or a full-height cent-like sign), and it started as a "C", for capitulum.

Complimentary Extra Bonus Sentence:
BTW, Parkes also says that the pilcrow replaced the "paragraphus" (which was marked in various ways, including a section symbol).

Tiffany:
Parkes also writes: "Scribes used the [double-slash] as a direction to the rubricator, but it was often left to fulfil the function of the paraph itself."

hhp

hrant's picture

(Greg, sorry for the digression.)

BTW, I was thinking the same thing as Jacques:
This thing is crying out for an outline font.

hhp

kentlew's picture

Hrant --

Right: *capitulum*! -- I knew it was a C. You can still see traces of this in a pilcrow like BR made for Centaur.

The Parkes was an interlibrary loan, so it went back to wherever it came from, and is not readily accessible.

-- K.

gregorycadars's picture

I redrew some characters (specially lc "y" & uc "S","Q" and "Y") and made a serif version. Comments are welcome!

©Cadars2002

hrant's picture

Wow, Greg - great stuff!
The only "error" of sorts that I might point out is that the eszet in your serif face shouldn't have a top serif. (But I think the unconventional serif on the pilcrow is great.)

BTW, I think you should make your "at" signs monocameral inside - this form is too much "an 'a' with a circle around it", as opposed to an "at" sign.

hhp

gregorycadars's picture

I need a name for that font. The _sans got a american feeling, but I can't find a good name. Perhaps a strict and ridiculous name ending with "a"...Officia?
Ideas, someone? I give a copy of this fonts for a perfect name

Stephen Coles's picture

Stricta Sans and Stricta Serif

hrant's picture

Somehow, I'm thinking the name should start with a "B"...
And since this is a display face with a loud and clear voice, maybe "Bugle"?

http://images.google.com/images?q=bugle&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi

hhp

Stephen Coles's picture

Ohhh, Hrant is right. Call it Bugle for sure. Perfect.

seg's picture

Neta Sans & Neta Serif
Gimps, Wender, Sansia

gregorycadars's picture

Thank you for these names!
Bugle seems too "military oriented" ( : / ) for me and
doesn't speak too much for non-english people I think.
Perhaps Stricta serves more the idea of a mechanical feeling?

hrant's picture

"Trumpet"? (And it's both a verb and a noun.)
I think "Stricta" is too Bauhaus for this design. I do see the goemetry, but in the context of "griddy" bitmap fonts it actually seems pretty human. I think any name that evokes "announcing loudly" would really work.

hhp

marcox's picture

Clarion?

Stephen Coles's picture

A nice name, Marc, but there's already this prim Clarendon schoolmarm.

marcox's picture

Goudy was right -- the old guys really have stolen all of our best ideas!

Joe Pemberton's picture

Greg, the triangular A is great. Round-top
and square As are the bane of bitmaps.

PS - And, I agree that this face is not rigid
enough to deserve a name like 'stricta.' How
about 'fatta?'

sevenfingers's picture

'fatta' means 'understand' in swedish. :)

rcapeto's picture

Why don't you call it 'Huge'? I thought
the thread's title was the intended name
of the font, and I liked it.

gregorycadars's picture

So, we got:

_HUGE
_STRICTA
_BUGLE
_NETA
_FATTA
_TRUMPET

I can't take a decision. Fatta sounds nice, anyway. Other ideas?

gregorycadars's picture

And the winner is...
FATTA!, by Joe Pemberton, (who's now the
first owner of this highly kerned font.)
cause the swedish meaning of this word
decides me.(so, Richard, you also won)

Thank you all.

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