Trying to get native typography features from Mac at Windows

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Andrés Sanhueza's picture
Joined: 15 Oct 2007 - 4:19pm
Trying to get native typography features from Mac at Windows
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I recently acquired an HP laptop with Windows 8. It's pretty fast, yet I'm unsure if it was worth it (I got it because a Macbook of similar characteristics cost 3 times more), but basically because I was using (and still) an iMac for about 4 years and I kind of get used too much to many of their friendlier quirks. Typography related, I miss from Windows:

—The Mac keyboard allows to type additional characters besides the default layout much easier (the ones from the legacy Apple character encoding), which for me at least is very useful. I haven't found a good way to make the same on Windows 8 yet.
—Windows "Character map" is pretty dull looking comparer to the Mac equivalent and, unlike Mac, it hasn't been updated from years! (even if additional Unicode characters are still being added to their fonts).
—It don't have any fancy app to manage the fonts, although unlike Mac, I like they keep all in the same folder.

Any suggestions? It was worth it? Besides typography, I also work with Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator and Premiere. All of the stuff is cross-plataform, but I'm starting to worry that were I work most people use Mac exclusive Final Cut for video edition.

Patrick Lee's picture
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Joined: 28 Feb 2007 - 2:08pm
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You can get an alternate keyboard layout that mimics that of a Mac here:
http://ohkine.tumblr.com/post/376098469/macintosh-keyboard-layouts-for-w...

I consider it a must even though I’ve never been a Mac person. It sometimes behaves a little oddly in InDesign (you’ll see what I mean after using it for a few days), but other than that works perfectly.

A popular, free font manager is NexusFont, and it also includes its own character map. I’ve experimented with it, and it seemed nice, but it just wasn’t necessary enough for me to get into the habit of using it.

Patrick Lee's picture
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Joined: 28 Feb 2007 - 2:08pm
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Oh, also, it only just occurred to me that it would be helpful for you to know that in Windows, you’re much better off learning the “alt codes” for often-used special characters than making frequent trips to the Character Map and back.

You can see them in the lower right corner of the Character Map windows (where it says “Keystroke”), and you enter them by holding the left Alt key and entering the numeric code on your numpad (including any leading zeroes), so an em-dash, for example, is Alt+0151.