Syncratica

designalchemy's picture

A futuristic face in early stages of development. I see it being used in a
science fiction movie on a cargo ship traveling into the void.syncratica

beejay's picture

There's your Sigma E. Very futuristic. It's intriguing to look at the forms and visualize how you made them. Do you have a method?

bj

designalchemy's picture

I sketch at the coffehouse across from my studio most days out of the week. I often think of the end user/project before I even start. In the case of Syncratica I did several Pieces that will be fused together. I often like the idea of shapes that can be rotated or mirrored to create something new.Syncraticasketch.jpg

hrant's picture

I like this a lot. Finish it!

hhp

hrant's picture

> how naturally these letters come together in recognizalbe ways--even though they are contrary to the way we draw letters.

The explanation is simple, and serves to debunk the importance of calligraphy in type design: reading and writing are separate things.

Or, as I've become fond of saying:
The hand delivers a fluidity that the eye didn't ask for.

hhp

Joe Pemberton's picture

I love that R. Mmm, gestalt.

Joe Pemberton's picture

What's interesting is how naturally these
letters come together in recognizalbe
ways--even though they are contrary to the way
we draw letters. You can imagine some
otherworldly system where these work
perfectly naturally.

Take the K. It's the wrong way to draw a K.
However, you've devised a system with the
other letters that makes that K a very likely
possibility. Contrast this with your "Kotica"
which takes our common method of drawing a
B, for example, and forces it into some
geometry where it feels forced.

Am I the only one who thinks this?

Good luck with it.

anonymous's picture

> The hand delivers a fluidity that the eye didn't ask for.

(Now I know what verse to put on Hrant's birthday card. :D )

This is really an intriguing face -- one of the most interesting experiemnts I've seen in a long time, and certainly one of the most successful at pushing the envelope of glyph shapes.

You could almost call the "W" a "doubledoubleyou".

I can't wait to see the full character set. Nice work.

David

Syndicate content Syndicate content