Archive through March 24, 2003

hrant's picture

John, you realize that your vacationing is now limited to delicately-timed daytrips to Vancouver Island.

hhp

John Hudson's picture

Ahem.

17. The quizmaster (me, again) reserves the right to disappear for extended periods of time to undisclosed locations and may not be required to reveal his whereabouts during this time or upon his return. During such times, general anarchy may reign on this thread, which should be understood as a salutary opportunity to execerise individual and collective responsibility. New rules may be invented during this time by any participant, and may enter into force by majority vote or popular acclaim. The quizmaster (you know who) reserves the right to overturn such rules on his return, but has enough faith in the anarchist project to hope that this will be unnecessary. Dancing is, of course, permitted.

hrant's picture

Rodolfo, are you sure it's 19th century, and not late 18th?

hhp

kentlew's picture

[Sorry, I've been having trouble with my phone lines and was unable to get online]

>The answer is Zocalo.

Hmm. I don't have the time or patience to download your source, but I asked Cyrus last Friday and he said:

"What a strange discussion. Anyway, it has always been called Universal. It was commisioned by them."

-- K.

hrant's picture

> "it has always been called Universal."

That's strange.
I guess just ask him why it says "The font Universal was originally known as Zocalo. Zocalo

rcapeto's picture

16. There are no bonus points awarded for correctly answering
two or more questions in a row, [..] the honour is reward enough.


Then the quizmaster should create a Type Quiz Hall of Fame, where
people would be inducted after a certain number of correct answers.
This will also give them the right to sport a Type Quiz Hall of
Fame badge, perhaps in the form of an icon included into their
typophile pic. ;) If you're anal, you'll create a "tiered" hall of
fame, with different levels of "honour". ;)


Rodolfo, are you sure it's 19th century, and not late 18th?

19th. Well, I realize that this is difficult - the connection to
typographic mainstream, apart from the legibility research, is
tenuous. Tips, tips, tips: the gentleman in question was financed
in his endeavours by a lovely lady, the daughter of a famous
poet, who for his part died far from home, in a country for which
independence he had fought.

If no one gets it now, I'll post an easy one (I won't be able to
stay online all the time!).

antiuser's picture

Charles Babbage.
His "Analytical Engine" was the precursor of modern computing.

The lovely lady would be Ada Byron, also known as Lady Lovelace, daughter of Lord Byron.

rcapeto's picture

Brilliant, Santi!

Go ahead, it's your turn. I'll see you in that
hall of fame one of these days.

References. For Babbage''s legibility research:
Herbert Spencer, The visible word; for Babbage,
Lady Ada, and the Analytical Engine, there are
zillions of references - to keep it close to
design, I recommend Charles and Ray Eames,
A computer perspective.

antiuser's picture

I'll have a really hard time thinking of a question. You guys know way, way more than me.

hrant's picture

Adriano, great catch!
Rodolfo, great question... Ada is always in my mind, but I never made the connection from Babbage to legibility (even though I've read Spencer's wonderful work).

> it's your turn

Technically, not for another hour.

> You guys know way, way more than me.

Apparently not! :-)

hhp

antiuser's picture

Well, I tried to think of something hard, but I am not nearly as well-read and informed as most of you guys are (I'm really a type newbie), so even a question that would be hard for me is a piece of cake for you all... I'm sure this will be cracked in a matter of minutes :-)

One of Emigre's most recent releases is a serifed face based on the designs of a 16th century French punchcutter. Who is he, what's the font called and who designed it?

Isaac's picture

tribute, designed by frank heine, based on renaissance antiqua by, i think, francis guyot.

Isaac's picture

i meant fran

antiuser's picture

Yes, that's correct.

Isaac's picture

so i guess i should wait an hour, not just to obey the rules,
but because i don't have a decent question ready. i reckon
i'm in the "over-my-head" category.

rcapeto's picture

tribute, designed by frank heine, based on
renaissance antiqua by, i think, francis guyot.


When I first saw the images of Tribute at the Emigre
site - and perhaps influenced by Bill Troop's invectives
at the now deleted thread at typographi.ca - I thought
that Tribute was really a sort of unusable freak. But
when I saw it in print in the Emigre booklet (which I
received only recently) I began to quite like it. It's
a charming face. Just "call it what it is". ;)

Isaac's picture

what? emigre publishing an unusable freak?
actually, that's what i thought the first time
i saw a lot of emigre's stuff. but i've since
decided on "very distinctive" rather than
unusable. isn't that a little nicer?

Isaac's picture

alright. name the type designer whose font appeared in an ad (name the company the
ad was for while you're at it) in which another of the designer's work was featured.

that makes no sense. there was an ad. it used a font. the font was designed by someone.
in the ad, something in the background also pertains to something the font designer
designed for. get it? name the type designer and the company the ad was for.

what a stupid question.

Isaac's picture

i'm going to take a shower. after that i'm going to sleep. so hurry up.

Isaac's picture

hint 1: baja chicago

oh yeah, name the face too.

Isaac's picture

hint 2: the ad is typographically related to certain nike ads
(probably because they were done by the same ad agency.
gotta get the most out of the license, right?).

Isaac's picture

is this question too dumb or am i being too vague?

hint 3: motor vehicle transportation

rcapeto's picture

I suppose the ad you're talking about was not
published worldwide, so you'd have to at least
vaguely indicate its geographical abrangence...

Maybe the kind of media where it appeared too?

hrant's picture

David Carson riding a Vespa?

hhp

cheshiredave's picture

I can't believe I figured this out: It's Rick Valicenti and chester's Infinity, used for both Nike Shox and Subaru Baja.

Isaac's picture

wicked. i thought maybe i was being too mysterious.

cheshiredave's picture

OK, here's a little wordplay for y'all: what typeface is suggested by the clue "very Tschichold"?

hrant's picture

Talk about being on a different wavelength... :-)

hhp

dana's picture

could it be Trajan? ("tra" from "tres: meaning "very"; and "jan" as the first name of Tishichold

Stephen Coles's picture

Yes, you are being too vague. Right now all I'm hearing
is: "what's the font used in an auto ad and who
designed it". Maybe something more specific about the
ad or the significance of the designer/font/product.

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