Ampersands

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Anonymous's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2002 - 1:06pm
Ampersands
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Can we make the rounds and have everyone post their favorite ampersands? Im really curious as to which faces have more quirky and expressive ones, and im sure most of you know a few gems out there… As for me, im still stuck on Scala. The whole way it doesnt connect is just so…sexy…mm.

Hrant H Papazian's picture
Joined: 3 May 2000 - 11:00am
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Pascal 60 pt:
pascal&

hhp

Andreas Seidel's picture
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Joined: 8 Mar 2002 - 3:44am
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hrant: Do you mean the whole latin project page?

http://gymn-benedictinum.de/san_projekt/augustinus/

I`m sure other usefull sources like this are on the net. But mostly not in english. :-)

Hrant H Papazian's picture
Joined: 3 May 2000 - 11:00am
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I can’t read German (yet) so I’m wondering:
What is that list of abreviations, exactly? Just a collection from a single document, or from an exhaustive list of documents, or what? And what about the “parent” page?

Like if somebody wanted to put those in his font, how well would those two pages cover him?

hhp

Andreas Seidel's picture
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Joined: 8 Mar 2002 - 3:44am
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Him, hope I can translate it right. This site is a school project of a christian monk monastery.

The letters and ligatures derived from historical hand written sources and help to read and decode the old latin scripts from the library.

The project was inspired by same samples from a book restorage. In the upcoming time of letter print, most of the original scripts used or cuted to repair the “new” and “better” printed books. Nowadays some of such historical samples will be found in such early printed books if they will be restored again.

Like yesterday or so, some new unknown samples of the “hildebrands lied” are found in an Austrian monastery.

So, these samples are for historical research only and not samples for new fonts designs. :-)

Back to the topic — It`s interesting to see such historical forms.

John Hudson's picture
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Joined: 21 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
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The list is far from comprehensive, although it does contain the most frequenly encountered scribal contractions. The standard texts on scribal contractions are:

Cappelli, Adriano. Lexicon abbreviaturarum: dizionario di abbreviature latine ed italiane.

Chassant, Louis-Alphonse. Dictionnaire des abr

Hrant H Papazian's picture
Joined: 3 May 2000 - 11:00am
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Thanks to both!

> for historical research only

Or setting historical texts. Or showing off.

hhp

Matha Stand�n's picture
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Joined: 18 Jan 2003 - 5:13am
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John,
Thanks for that bit of info on the Tironian et sign. I never made the connection. Here’s a little more info that you may or may not already know.

The Tironian et sign was also used in Irish manuscripts as a shorthand form of ‘et’ and ‘ead’ when they constituted a whole syllable. (1)
If you tag on a ‘c’ you get ‘etc.’ (2)
It was also used for ‘

Hrant H Papazian's picture
Joined: 3 May 2000 - 11:00am
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Hey, what’s that font?  ;-)

hhp

Matha Stand�n's picture
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Joined: 18 Jan 2003 - 5:13am
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Hey, what’s that font? ;-)

Historical and showing off

M.

Michael Schlierbach's picture
Joined: 8 Jan 2003 - 11:00am
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Dolly from underware (http://www.underware.nl) I like:
Dolly Ampersand
Dolly normal, Dolly Small Caps and Dolly Italic.

Michael

Michael Schlierbach's picture
Joined: 8 Jan 2003 - 11:00am
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What I most like is this piece of fine work.
The printer/setter tried and succeeded to make a colourful text without boring repeats.
Throughout the whole book he tried to use different ampersands whenever possible
(or better: whenever they were to close).
Very thoughtful work.
Michael
intelligent use of different ampersands

John Hudson's picture
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Joined: 21 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
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Oh yes, the Dolly ampersands are splendid. We use the one on the right in the promotional material for the ATypI conference in Vancouver. Just the ampersand, mind you; everything else is in Matthew Carter’s Fenway and Jeremy Tankard’s Shaker.

andrea schmidt's picture
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Joined: 11 Jan 2003 - 2:02am
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granjon

there are some nice ampersand samples like this one designed by robert granjon in the article on the adobe website: http://www.adobe.com/type/topics/theampersand.html (which i’m sure many of you have already read)

isaac's picture
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Joined: 21 Oct 2002 - 11:00pm
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BQ

Matha Stand�n's picture
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Joined: 18 Jan 2003 - 5:13am
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Here’s a rubbing of another Irish ampersand I’m very fond of by Michael Biggs:
amp
and here’s a photo:
and

Matha

Hrant H Papazian's picture
Joined: 3 May 2000 - 11:00am
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Nice rub.

hhp

andrea schmidt's picture
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Joined: 11 Jan 2003 - 2:02am
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this is nice, it just showed up in my office on a paper sample, can anyone identify it?

mysteryAmp

andrea schmidt's picture
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Joined: 11 Jan 2003 - 2:02am
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wow you guys are slow today; )

Tiffany Wardle's picture
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Joined: 13 Jul 2001 - 11:00am
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Michael —> What is this text?

Michael Schlierbach's picture
Joined: 8 Jan 2003 - 11:00am
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It’s from a book printed 1653 about … my latin leaves me.
I think it’s about the honestly and dignite habit of priests (my english leaves me too).
Here the title: (note the two ampersands in the line above the illustration!)

Michael
title of beautiful et-work

seanmichael's picture
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Joined: 16 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
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Look at those long ss’.

_smc

John Hudson's picture
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Joined: 21 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
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Here’s an example of the Mother of All Ampersands.
Tironian et sign (agus)
This is the Tironian et sign, which is still used today in Gaelic text (it is known in Irish as agus). This sign derives from the Roman judicial shorthand system developed by Marcus Tullius Tiro, Cicero’s scribe and namesake of a certain type foundry. The top of the Tironian ampersand is aligned to the x-height. Sometimes it descends below the baseline, looking like — sometimes too much like — an oldstyle number seven; in other examples it stops at the baseline. All Gaelic fonts should contain this characters. Note that it has its own Unicode codepoint, U+204A, to distinguish it from the usual ampersand, because it is sometimes found in texts used alongside the modern form.

Cheshire Dave's picture
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Joined: 29 Aug 2002 - 11:00am
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For a wide variety of approaches, check out Adobe’s subset of Poetica that’s all ampersands, all the time.

Another one: I was surprised and pleased by the ampersand that comes with Lux Sans

Andreas Seidel's picture
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Hrant H Papazian's picture
Joined: 3 May 2000 - 11:00am
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Wow.
Do_you/does_anybody know how comprehensive this is?

hhp

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