Interior design brand logo

Classification: 

Any idea about this font? Looking at the website [[http://www.louisebradley.co.uk/]] , I thought it could be Lato (along with the rest). But, no chance.

Comments

Proba Pro Thin?:

http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/konstantynov/proba-pro/

Oddly enough, the site features an ebook in which the headlines appear to be set in Neue Helvetica 25 Ultra Light, but that's not the font used in the logo.

It's a close one, indeed. But there's something strange about the "R" in the logo...

Actually, the only letterform in Proba that doesn't match up nicely with the logo is the B--Proba's is too narrow.

Maybe Fivos, another forum member, can come up with a better match for you....

Or maybe, it being a logo, the |B| was adjusted as needed.

That and the perpendicular cut on the leg of the 'R'... it almost appears as though the same may be true of the 'A' and the 'Y' similar to the way that angled terminals are treated in Syntax.

@all: Thanks for replying.
@kthomps5: You're right, the B instead of the R.

Compare Proba Pro Thin with Cyntho Pro Thin from the same designer

http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/konstantynov/cyntho-pro/
Perhaps most of the letters from Proba Pro Thin and _B_ from Cyntho Pro Thin?
don

Good find, Don, but to jvdesign's point the legs of the R and A, and the arms of the Y all terminate at right angles to their strokes (at least on the fabricated sign in the photo), not parallel to the baseline.

They don't do that in either Proba or Cyntho.

Now that could just be a function of the sign fabrication, but it could also mean we are close but not quite.

At the very least, Proba and Cyntho are very good alternates.