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Hans Möhring's Florida 1932

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The only information I can find on Hans Möhring's Florida 1932 is a set of upper case letters from A to W in the Klingspor Schriftdesigner pdf on him:
http://bahoe.de/Klingspor/KlingsporKuenstler/Schriftdesigner/Moehring/Mo...
For ease of reference, here is A to W, in a digital interpretation I did based on the letters in the Klingspor pdf.

Note the asymmetrical stroke weight in _O_, _B_, _D_, _P_, and _R_.
I was wondering if there was a lower case and other characters and what they might look like.
The foundry might have been Wilhelm Woellmer.
Thanks.
Don

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Typophile's glitches strike again. I am unable to edit my original post.
I included an image of my early digital version rather than the current one. So please replace it in your mind with the following:

Thanks
Don

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|X|, |Y|, and |Z| could be seen on the credits of "Persona": http://youtu.be/iO4gk3_kZjU?t=6m23s (linked in this font ID thread: http://typophile.com/node/120614).
Not exactly sharp, but at least the shapes, contrast and proportions are visible.
Also some awkward so-tight-they-look-like-stubs umlauts.
I think this is a caps-only design. Moreover, the position of diereses and the retracted |Q|'s tail make me think it was designed as a titling typeface intended to take up any ascender and descender space available.

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Thanks Riccardo, I'll go though the _Persona_ credits and check _X_, _Y_ and _Z_. Also for the sunken umlauts.
Any thoughts from any other of our historically minded typophiles?
Don

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I dislike the like the later, “cleaner” version, it is lacking in subtlety, and hence warmth.

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It’s strange how the sharper look make it appear more art deco, “more Peignot” to me, thus less modern.
In any case, I don’t think the pointed terminals (on |M|, |N|, etc.) belong to the original design. Also, judging by the version used for the DVD cover,* indubitably lifted directly from the film, the |N|’s thin stems appear to be a bit tapered. It could be an artefact of photo reproduction, but I think they harmonise nicely with |E|, |T|, etc.
Sorry to not adding any valuable historical information.

* http://www.criterion.com/films/28491-persona
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81%2B3y2LIDBL._SL1500_.jpg

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Yup, thought about that too. There's some fascinating almost imperceptible tapering going on here and then that could be reinserted in an interesting way. Left leg of the A, for instance, and in K+V+W. Also tapered terminals on S, J, G and C. Is your thinning of the lower bowl of B intentional?

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Ye, I can see that a recreation would:
1. Loose the points
2. Probably, taper thin strokes, like _N_ and perhaps elsewhere. This was not obvious from the small scale letters in the Klingspor pdf, but could be there.
I'm not certain about the bulbous ends. The letters in the Klingspor pdf don't seem to have them. I know from previous research of Criterion covers that they sometimes rework fonts substantially.
As for the sharper look of this digitization, it might look more Art Deco than my scan but the thickness and alignment of the clean digital strokes follows the scan very closely, with the exception of the the tapered thin strokes of _N_ which I probably incorrectly interpreted as a printing effect rather than a design feature.
As for subtlety and warmth, I see a hard edge Art Deco design of 1932 in the letters in the Klingspor pdf with variations being mainly the result of the printing and scanning process.
This issue could be clarified by a better specimen.
Still would love to know if there is a lower case and other characters.
BTW I agree with the similar to Peignot observation. This is a design of that era.
Don

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Thinning the lower bowl on the _B_ is clearly an error which I need to adjust.
As for possible tapering in lhs of _A_, and _K_, _V_ and _W_ I do believe you are right. Will adjust.
The clean digital does taper the terminals on _S_, _J_, _G_ and _C_. But I made them taper to thin rather than to thicker. Will adjust.
Still nothing on the a better specimen or a lower case and other characters?
Don

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This letterpress printshop offers self-printed specimens of the Florida metal type (at what looks to be about 20 points) for €6. Might be worth ordering if you can find no other source. :)

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Nice find Johan!

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Many thanks Johan!
You have answered my question.
The scale is small but I can see the design concept. Even includes an appropriate ampersand, a curled tail _?_ and the sunken umlauts.
So after revising up my digital UC I can do a LC that matches. I am tending towards a double decker _a_ and a single story _g_.
don

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Florida was indeed first cast by Wilhelm Woellmer (Jaspert: 1931; Reichardt: 1932), and later (Schriftkartei Weber: 1938) by C.E. Weber. There is no lowercase.

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Thanks Florian for the provenance and confirmation of no lowercase.
Don