Welcome to Typophile
Please Sign in.

BOXDON - latin typeface for vertical layout

Primary tabs

9 posts / 0 new
Last post
Shuhei Toyoda's picture
Offline
Joined: 13 Dec 2014 - 5:27pm
BOXDON - latin typeface for vertical layout
0

Hello Typephile members.

I've released my typeface "BOXDON" which was especially designed for vertical layout. The typeface looks like boxes or playing blocks with minimal counter space to enhance 'stacked' feeling as much as possible.

In general, Japanese, Chinese and Mongolian, etc. is well known as languages which can have vertical layout system. However, even in usage of Latin alphabets, we can see some examples of vertical layout as building signage and spine of books. Then I thought that we have possibility to design special typeface for vertical layout to dig out expansion of type design world.

I hope this typeface gives spicy inspiration to your graphic design..

BOXDON at MyFonts.

Shuhei Toyoda's picture
Offline
Joined: 13 Dec 2014 - 5:27pm
0

Sorry - I had mistaken to paste images..

Bob Evans's picture
Offline
Joined: 18 May 2005 - 7:20am
0

Interesting idea but very hard to read.

Shuhei Toyoda's picture
Offline
Joined: 13 Dec 2014 - 5:27pm
0

Hi bojev
Thank you for your comment.
Yes... it has very small counter space in order to make it like a block as much as possible. However it might be possible to enlarge it slightly to increase visibility for small sizes...

André Simard's picture
Offline
Joined: 25 Nov 2004 - 12:11pm
0

I don't think the first target of this typeface is its readability but the impact it gives in some circumstances as the word SLOW LIFE shown in the image. I think that some character should be revised as the S and 5. Keep going.

Bob Evans's picture
Offline
Joined: 18 May 2005 - 7:20am
0

A font by its very nature needs to be read at some level - as I said, this is an interesting concept it just needs to be more readable.

Shuhei Toyoda's picture
Offline
Joined: 13 Dec 2014 - 5:27pm
0

Hi sim and bojev

Thank you for your comments. I tried increasing counter space as a study, but as you can see, the result was not good - ’stacking’ feeling was lost and the whole shape became unstable.
I’m now thinking to make another variant which will have more squared shape. It will be more generic proportion and it might help to increase readability with keeping minimum counter space and ’stacked’ feeling.
And also thank you for giving comment for S and 5. I'll have study about it.

Martin Silvertant's picture
Joined: 31 Dec 2009 - 11:51pm
0

but as you can see, the result was not good - ’stacking’ feeling was lost and the whole shape became unstable.

I'm not sure the shapes are necessarily unstable. The counter space 01 sample could work well if you increase the spacing accordingly. But ultimately it seems you're not increasing readability so much as merely creating optical variants. Counter space 01 could be used at smaller sizes, and Counter space 02 even smaller than that. I don't feel like the readability changes drastically with the enlarged counter size. In fact, I think counter space 01 has the correct counter space for the size it's shown at, while I feel the current design works well at the larger sizes you showed in your original post, but doesn't work as well at the size you're showing now. The counters and spacing are just too tight.

As for the readability in general, I think it's not too bad at display size. Like André (sim) implied, the typeface works quite well for "slow life". However, I just noticed you increased the tracking in that sample, which is why it's easier to read as well. I think the conclusion to draw here is that you current design works well at very large sizes, while for most display uses people probably require "Enlarged counter space 01" with greater spacing. By making optical variants you will greatly increase the application range of your typeface. Whether there's a need for it I don't know. You will have to decide for yourself.

The last thing I want to say is that I think for this typeface ligatures should be avoided. In the third picture I can read "I'm" and "don't" and I think the first sample says "A 'n' D", but the rest I simply can't read. The shapes confuse me to such large extent that I can't even try to encode them. For display typefaces it can be fine if it takes people longer to read it, but with the ligatures in this design I feel it becomes impossible to read. Do note you're at the outer edge of several restrictions on type in general; you're somewhere at the most extreme width, you're using the highest weight and the smallest possible counters, the tightest spacing and if you think of the negative space between letters and in counters as a hairline stroke, depending on the size your typeface is used at you actually went beyond the outer limit of how small hairline strokes should be. If you work with so many extremes in type, it will be very risky to introduce ligatures as well. Just to offer some perspective, I've had a client who didn't want me to use discretionary ligatures in Calibri because they didn't understand it. Obviously ligatures are getting more and more common again, but don't make it unnecessarily confusing. Ligatures should be included predominantly to improve the reading experience. When they actually greatly disrupt the reading experience, you might have to rethink what you're doing.

Shuhei Toyoda's picture
Offline
Joined: 13 Dec 2014 - 5:27pm
0

Hi Martin

Thank you so much for your detailed comment and sorry for my late reply.
Especially, your comment regarding ligatures is really appreciated. As you said, I had same experience that my clients (for other graphic design work) didn't understand what ligature is and they have recognised it as something error..
I am aware that I need to think about balance between keeping experimental extraordinary looking and readability. It's always challenge to me.