Lettering on Sarjeant Gallery (1912) in Wanganui, New Zealand

jasper7777's picture

This sign appears on an art gallery building that was built in 1912 called the Serjeant gallery in Wanganui New Zealand.
I am pretty sure the Rs and the J were customized-- but what typeface or font do you think was used as a reference to make the sign?

cheers

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serjeant.jpg38.16 KB
Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

It's based on no font. It's done by hand.

Bald Condensed's picture

Lettering on building -- vintage one that is, not modern signs -- is often either custom designed or painted using models that often have no equivalent in 'type'.

That being said, we can probably find similar stuff.

jasper7777's picture

Pieters right -- it is hand done -- -- but it must have been origianally drawn based on some font. I found Daily News and thought it was-close but no banana.

Bald Condensed's picture

(...) but it must have been originally drawn based on some font.

Not necessarily. Some of the models used by sign painters had absolutely nothing to do with fonts -- typefaces used in the printing industry. As those models may have had no equivalent with printing types, they could possibly be unknown to that (our) community. The same problem exists with alphabets for rubber stamps, license plates, road signage, sewing and other specific applications.

jasper7777's picture

Even if it wasnt a font and it was a model-- I wish I could find that model...

The wedge shaped serifs, the point at the top of the A and the way the serifs on the E the T and the L point outwards-- remind me of the font Della Robia-- which was designed in 1902-- and the Serjeant Gallery was built in 1912. But Della Robia is much more expanded.

Bald Condensed's picture

Personally the classic structure and sharp serifs made me think of Nick Shinn's Beaufort. Finding a match for that wonky R and J would be nice though. :^)

jasper7777's picture

Thanks— that's a lot closer-- I think the wonky J was the sign makers way of forcing the letterform to be more like a Maori Koru---- maybe -- its done a lot here in New Zealand.

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