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Reversed apostrophe and Helvetica

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Gregg Einhorn's picture
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Joined: 30 Jan 2005 - 2:36am
Reversed apostrophe and Helvetica
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this apostrophe doesn't look quite right to me.

do you think i should replace the apostrophe with one from another font or is it ok as is?

thanks,

gregg

Jan Erdmann's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2007 - 8:36am
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It’s just the wrong one.

Take this one > ’

Oh, you want it reversed?
Maybe something more round - like Clarendon.

Gregg Einhorn's picture
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Joined: 30 Jan 2005 - 2:36am
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i don't need it reversed - is the regular apostrophe the correct usage in this case?

Jan Erdmann's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2007 - 8:36am
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I’d say so.

Mark Simonson's picture
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Joined: 3 Dec 2001 - 11:00am
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is the regular apostrophe the correct usage in this case?

Yes! What you've got in your sample is a single left quote mark, not an apostrophe. An apostrophe is the same as a single right quote mark.

Unfortunately, we see this mistake frequently due to the simplemindedness of desktop publishing software, which can't tell the difference between the beginning of a quoted passage and a contraction. So much for "smart" quotes.

Gregg Einhorn's picture
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Joined: 30 Jan 2005 - 2:36am
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thanks a million!

Charles Ellertson's picture
Joined: 3 Nov 2004 - 11:00am
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Traditionally, what you want is a "turned comma." An apostrophe is a "raised comma." The "reversed apostrophe" or "reversed quote" is yet a different character -- see the Unicode General punctuation range, I forget the Unicode number. The Lakeside Press use to use reversed quotes & double quotes in a series they published -- Tom Horn used them for sure.

Mark Simonson's picture
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Joined: 3 Dec 2001 - 11:00am
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Traditionally, what you want is a “turned comma.”

You do? On a numerical contraction like ’70?

Linda Cunningham's picture
Joined: 26 Jul 2006 - 3:55pm
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No, Mark, for publications in North America you are correct, not only in your assessment of what is the current state and what the appropriate replacement should be, but also in how it got there.

Village's picture
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Joined: 25 Jun 2006 - 8:52pm
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"is the regular apostrophe the correct usage in this case?"

Yes, and here's why: because in this case, the apostrophe indicates an omission. Which is why the apostrophe is in "here's", which is a truncated version of "here is" which omits the space and i.

In your case, the apostrophe indicates the omitted 20.

Charles Ellertson's picture
Joined: 3 Nov 2004 - 11:00am
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Mark, you're right. I got so caught up in the naming convention, I forgot the original problem.

I do think the naming conventions have some importance, perhaps less so in this instance, but rather more when the marks are used in phonetics . . .esp. since some web sites use the 'straight-up-and-down" mark for an 'apostrophe,' which leads to yet more confusion.