Coming Soon: A Ruble Symbol

speter's picture

Just what everybody who just added Cyrillic to their fonts needs.

http://www.kommersant.com/p-10761/Symbol_ruble/

And just how ugly could this monster be?

http://english.newslab.ru/news/215574

Steve
(in Moscow at the moment)

Quincunx's picture

That is rather ugly.

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

But better than the Euro sign!

Linda Cunningham's picture

Looks like a rip-off of the Euro sign (and the yen) though....

AndrewSipe's picture

Yeah, but how about in Helvetica...

Nick Shinn's picture

OMG, it's Latinized
Off with the leg!

***

Meta Extra Bold should be interesting :-)

AndrewSipe's picture

Meta Black Ruble...

hrant's picture

And we thought the Yen was cramped...

I think I know how I'll make mine: one bar through
the top counter and one through the bottom stem.

hhp

paul d hunt's picture

hopefully this has not been approved yet as the first article hints at. i hope the other 2 final designs are superior to this.

speter's picture

This site has some interesting takes on the symbol:

http://www.directdesign.ru/rubl/main.html

Click on the link that says Знаки и участники (just above www.index.ru). Vladimir Efimov of ParaType has a couple of ideas in there.

hrant's picture

Steve, I don't seem to be getting anything.

hhp

paul d hunt's picture

for those of you having troubles navigating the page referenced above, you can check out Vladimir Efimov's proposals here, here & here.

or you can browse the submissions by clicking on the little, black, numbered circles to the right of each name in the left-hand column.

paul d hunt's picture

here's an interesting concept. i doubt it'll fly in the post soviet era, or do Russians still use the hammer and sickle imagery?

speter's picture

Hrant, is absolutely nothing loading on the page?

Paul, yes, the hammer and sickle are still around, and there seems to be growing nostalgia for them. There was recently quite a battle over possibly removing them from the official Victory Banner, but they remain.

AndrewSipe's picture

I wasn't really impressed with the majority of the proposed designs.

Here's my take, though it might be mistaken for the Perscription Rx symbol, it's easy to reproduce by hand without looking like an extra letter or a manipulated P.

hrant's picture

I like the diagonal solutions, especially if it can be made
to look both like an "R" and an Er - that would be brilliant.
Especially if the top-left of the letter is rounded.

The Hammer & Sickle are regaining ground, but only in
an informal, and mostly nostalgic way - you'd never ever
be able to get that symbology adopted officially.

Steve, I have it working now - sorry.

Andrew, too much like the Rx symbol.

hhp

paul d hunt's picture

I would think that Russians would prefer a symbol that resembled the cyrillic Р (ER) instead of the latin R. I found it strange that so many of the proposed designs did incorporate the latin R.

hrant's picture

It's probably some internationalistic requirement.
The Indian Rupee isn't set in Devanagari!

On the other hand, a Er posing as an "R", like with
two diagonal legs, and a rounded top-left, would rule.

hhp

AndrewSipe's picture

A little Googling:

The United States Abbreviation Theory

One of the most popular theories is that the dollar sign is derived from the initials of the United States. If you superimpose a capital "U" on a capital "S" then drop the lower part of the "U", what you end up with is a version of the dollar symbol with two strokes. This theory was endorsed by the American libertarian philosopher and staunch defender of capitalism, Ayn Rand, in her novel Atlas Shrugged. Chapter 10 is entitled the Sign of the Dollar. Rand claimed the dollar sign was the symbol not only of the currency, but also the nation, a free economy, and a free mind.

Origin of the Euro:

Arthur Eisenmenger designed the € as a generic symbol of Europe years before the new currency was mooted. 'I drew it without much consideration,' he said in an interview some years ago. 'I wasn't thinking of the Euro at the time, but just something that symbolized Europe.'

So my guess would be they chose the Latin R for Russia, not Ruble, and that the symbol should represent Russia more than just a simple mark representing the type of currency.

hrant's picture

Maybe something like this... just less like a squid:

hhp

MHSmith's picture

Another P/R, slightly reminiscent of the goose step.

What is an Er, Hrant? I like your squid, looks menacing in a friendly way. Anyone remember The Day of the Triffids?

speter's picture

I still haven't been able to find out the three finalists, but I have found this which gives the 20 finalists:

http://www.rian.ru/photolents/20060613/49420820.html

hrant's picture

> Rand claimed the dollar sign was the symbol not only of the
> currency, but also the nation, a free economy, and a free mind.

Was.

hhp

hrant's picture

Marc, your glyph is nicely evocative of the waviness typical
of Cyrillic letterforms, but I have to think the bureaucrats
need lines and circles only...

The Er is the Russian letter (and the first in Rouble when spelled in Russian)
that looks like a "P", although it can have (and previously tended to have) a
soft top-left.

Ah: http://www.rian.ru/photolents/20060613/49420820_8.html _
A lot of them are really promising though - impressive.

hhp

kuroneko's picture

I want a swiss franc too with the swiss cross in it! lol

MHSmith's picture

The easy way: flipping round a paragraph sign. See Trajan, Giddyup and... Dolly, remarkably R-like. Not to mention the more obvious stiff ones.

blank's picture

I would think that Russians would prefer a symbol that resembled the cyrillic Р (ER) instead of the latin R. I found it strange that so many of the proposed designs did incorporate the latin R.

The first article mentions the Russians wanting the Ruble to become an international reserve currency—fat chance—so it makes sense to design a symbol that will make sense to foreigners. Especially when the government is expropriating corporations to sell them to foreign investors.

Si_Daniels's picture

I can't help but think that these new currency symbols are PR stunts (with the exception of the euro which had some political issues too) - after all the banks and financial institutions do not use anything as archaic as symbols, they use the ISO currency codes, USD, GBP and RUR.

By the way, if the World Bank's currency is the Wolfowitz, has it been devalued against the euro, and will it need to be renamed?

hrant's picture

> fat chance

True, it's the Yuan's turn next.

> Especially when the government is expropriating
> corporations to sell them to foreign investors.

That stopped with the departure of the criminal Yeltsin.

> has it been devalued

Devalued? If you count to zero, I guess.

hhp

Nick Shinn's picture

Actually, the problem with using the correct Cyrillic "Ruble" initial character, which looks like a Latin P, is that it's already taken. Here are most of the currency symbols.

Si_Daniels's picture

More info here... http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U20A0.pdf

That P with the bars is the Peso

Cheers, Si

cuttlefish's picture

That P with the bars is the Peso
Specifically, it's the Phillippine Peso. The Mexican Peso is indicated by the $.

Si_Daniels's picture

Most currency symbols belong behind bars ;-)

hrant's picture

I think the type of structure I'm talking about is dissimilar enough.

Simon, that's quite quotable! :-)

hhp

John Hudson's picture

Note that this is not posted as a recommended form but only as yet further proof that currency symbols should be invented by greengrocers writing on pieces of cardboard boxes with felt markers and not by committees or even by type designers. This form at least has the benefits of being hintable to remain legible at 7 pixels high (6 for a sans serif).

hrant's picture

> currency symbols should be invented by greengrocers

It should be tested by them (as well as others), but an important maxim here is that users are seldom the best creators. In this case one problem is that a Siberian greengrocer never needs to worry about his prices being mistaken as being in Philippine Pesos - but in the global context of course such things do matter.

Your form though is indeed nice... if you round the top-left. :-)

hhp

Si_Daniels's picture

"currency symbols should be invented by greengrocers"

That should be

"currency symbol's should be invented by greengrocer's"

;-)

John Hudson's picture

Hrant: but in the global context of course such things do matter.

In the global context, people don't use currency symbols because they are unreliable indicators. $ - what currency does that indicate? Yours or mine? USD or CAD or ?

International standard three-letter currency codes exist for precisely this reason.

Nick Shinn's picture

When will this be finalized?

speter's picture

"Sometime in the autumn" according to the news reports here.

speter's picture

[my ISP likes to play games with me---sorry for the double post]

hrant's picture

> people don’t use currency symbols because they are unreliable indicators.

This is only true to some extent. People do use the currency symbols
characters internationally. The reasons are that: people tend to be
more familiar with those than the three-Latin-letter representations;
and few of the symbols are as muddled as the "$".

hhp

Nick Shinn's picture

What about a Unicode name and number?
Do they have that already?

Si_Daniels's picture

I don't think so. 20B6 is the next free slot in the currency range.

cuttlefish's picture

Has anyone heard any new developments on this?

The most recent I can find is here: http://publishing.yudu.com/A23p4/rbth-30-08-07/resources/2.htm
The page uses some strange kind of Flash viewer. It seems to suggest the P with crossbar at the lower stem (as John Hudson showed above) is the design that won out.

cuttlefish's picture

Here is a video on the topic, also dating from last August, reaching the same conclusion:
Russia Today via YouTube

cuttlefish's picture

But hey, it could be worse. Here is a gallery with 20 proposals that appear to have been rejected.

dezcom's picture

I am inclined to think John Hudson's makes the mosr sense or something close to it.

ChrisL

John Hudson's picture

Hey, have I succeeded in devising a major currency symbol? Well, this calls for a celebratory glass of vodka.

Writing the sign quickly by hand, one ends up with something like this:

Still recognisable and distinctive, not confuseable with any numeral, which is what you want in a currency symbol.

Mel N. Collie's picture

" currency symbols should be invented by greengrocers writing on pieces of cardboard boxes"
I agree. It was approved by the Bank of Russia though.

"Here is a gallery with 20 proposals that appear to have been rejected."
I thought there were some pretty good tries.
One got close, but no one went for the Potemkin Ruble.

Seriously though, will a one-bar R work, like Yen 'n Dolla'?

Cheers!

dezcom's picture

Sure John, you and the Washington Redskins :-)

ChrisL

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