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Emilie Rene-Veronneau's picture
Joined: 17 Oct 2003 - 1:29pm
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Would anyone know if the ligature “

Chris's picture
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Joined: 23 Jun 2003 - 6:19pm
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I thought “Et cetera” was linguistically correct, sans

Chase J Goitia's picture
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Joined: 12 Apr 2004 - 11:14pm
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So is it linguistically correct to toss in

John Hudson's picture
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Joined: 21 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
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It isn’t linguistically incorrect but most people would think it a strange affectation.

Dan Reynolds's picture
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Joined: 20 Jul 2002 - 11:00am
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Since, in german,

Anonymous's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2002 - 1:06pm
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In Old (and Middle) English, the character

Emilie Rene-Veronneau's picture
Joined: 17 Oct 2003 - 1:29pm
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Hmm well I wouldn’t be surprised to word being mistreated every now and then. That’s the way it’s written in a text by George Pennec so I would guess it’s correct… Maybe there are other translations.

Opinions anyone? =)

Anonymous's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2002 - 1:06pm
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Using the ae ligature is considered somewhat archaic in U.S. English — in fact, American usage has dropped the leading a in most instances. (For example: encyclopaedia vs. encyclopedia.)

Although British style retains both letters in most instances, I do not know whether they commonly use the ligature or not. I suspect it is not necessarily improper to use it, but it may look quaint/mannered/overly formal.

Anonymous's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2002 - 1:06pm
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Moreover, I believe the æ ligature is only properly used in English for words derived from Latin that contain the specific ae dipthong in question, not any random occurrence of the a-e letter sequence.

Emilie Rene-Veronneau's picture
Joined: 17 Oct 2003 - 1:29pm
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Actually, my main text is in french but I think Et c

John Hudson's picture
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Joined: 21 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
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Emilie Rene-Veronneau's picture
Joined: 17 Oct 2003 - 1:29pm
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That’s more than I could have asked for, thanks!

Em

Anonymous's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2002 - 1:06pm
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In Norwegian and Danish, “æ” is not a ligature of “a” and “e”, but an independent letter, representing the vowel sound in English “hat”. Using “ae” as a substitute for “aelig;” in Norwegian and Danish would be akin to using “vv” as a substitute for “w” in English—comprehensible, but jarring.

Regarding “et cetera” vs “et caetera”: either is acceptable, but the former is found more frequently than the latter, at least in English language contexts.

I believe that “æ” and “œ” usage in (post-Anglo-Saxon) English had been preferred for words ultimately of Greek origin that were spelled with alpha-iota and omicron-iota respectively. As the Latin word “c(a)eterus” [for which “c(a)etera” is likely the feminine ablative] is not of Greek origin, it probably shouldn‘t be spelled with æ.

Anonymous's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2002 - 1:06pm
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