Christmas Roses

Sharon Van Lieu's picture

Some pictures of the Christmas Roses my husband gave me. They were so pretty, deep red inside and white on the outside. When they fell apart, I took pictures of the petals with shells.

Sharon

Comments

James Arboghast's picture

Mmm, lovely! Thanks for sharing Sharon. Very beautiful.

Another photographer I know makes flower-themed art prints using a direct positive exposure technique as follows: grab a large sheet of Agfachrome (formerly Cibachrome) color positive photographic paper, and lay flowers and such-like on top. Flattened flowers work better, and you can of course enhance their contact with the paper by laying a sheet of clear glass on top to press them closer against the surface. Expose the composition with a white light source---whatever temperature Agfachrome paper likes for white balance. Develop the "print" in the normal chemical process, and you end up with a one-off art print. The colors of the flowers and stems and leaves is transferred in the same way exposure to a transparency transfers colors via the direct positive process. Areas directly exposed to the white light come up white :^)

j a m e s

dezcom's picture

Lovely flowers, Sharon! Your husband chose them well.

ChrisL

Sharon Van Lieu's picture

Thanks to you both. They were extra pretty.

Sharon

James Arboghast's picture

Pick a song and sing a yellow nectarine
Take a bath I'll drink the water that you leave
If you should die before me ask if you can bring a friend
Pick a flower hold your breath and fade away

Lyrics by Scott Weiland

j a m e s

Ricardo Cordoba's picture

Beautiful photos and roses, Sharon. I love the one with all the "veins" (don't know the proper term, sorry).

Sharon Van Lieu's picture

Thank you, Ricardo. I'm not up on rose terminology either but I know what you mean. :-)

Sharon

HaleyFiege's picture

In a leaf it's called venation. Not sure if there's a specific term for petals.

Ricardo Cordoba's picture

Thanks, Haley. Makes sense to me, because the Spanish word for vein is "vena."

Sharon Van Lieu's picture

You're right, Haley. I looked it up and they are called veins and the pattern is called venation.

dezcom's picture

Great juvination!

ChrisL

Ricardo Cordoba's picture

Chris, I'm tempted to riff on that, but... I've thought better of it. :-)

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