Funky Sans - up for crit

Cassie's picture

Hi everyone,

This is my very first attempt at a typeface, and it was inspired by some hand lettering I did for a logo. I know there's still a lot of tweaking to do, and I would love love love any feedback!

Thanks in advance!

Cassie

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Cassie's picture

PS one of the things I'm having an issue with is the g. The y is also a little wierd in that its descender is not as long as it should be. Would it make sense to have the g and y have one descender length and the p, q and j have another?

Michael Wallner's picture

I think you have a really nice start. Just a few things I really noticed:

- the e, k, o, v, w, x, z are the same thickness throughout the letter, and the other letters have some variations. They seem to be from a different typefaces, at least to me.

- the w also seems a little wide and leaves a really bad space in the word "anyway" that I do not believe you could fix with kerning pairs.

- maybe the t works better at smaller sizes but at the size you provided it seems to drop below the baseline too much.

- the fl ligature looks odd where the ball in the f and the l collide. The purpose of ligatures is to really make the transition smooth and elegant.

ebensorkin's picture

The bottom of the y seems a little clunky.

Can you show us how you see this being used? Intended use will have a great deal of impact on the direction you would want to take this. The clearer you are about this the better the face will be.

Cassie's picture

Thanks for the feedback.

Here's the original logo (color) that I did, and then a version of what it would look like now that I've actually spent time on the letterforms (b & w). It would also be used as a display type on stationery and collateral. I'd really like it to be legible/readable at text sizes, although I know it won't be able to get too small since it is a little funky.

Michael: I know, I really struggled with that fl ligature. But I looked at a lot of other fonts with ball terminals, and that seems to be how the fl is treated. Any suggestions?

Thanks again.

eliason's picture

I'm not sure the angled terminals on bdhklmnpqru go with the bouncy feel of the rest - it's like a combination of X-Acto blades and bubbles - but the difference I suppose adds to the liveliness. I would experiment with the m, n, and r at least.

If y is giving you trouble: did you consider doing a y that is u-shaped with a curving descender instead of the diagonal form?

I agree that the fl ligature isn't working - I would abandon the idea of a ball terminal on a line that's not actually terminal.

I think all of your ligatures need to be spaced out more.

I like this font - it's fun. It says to me: Las Vegas, The Price is Right, Sherwood Schwartz shows, 60s stewardesses, Acapulco honeymoons.

ebensorkin's picture

Below is an image from Gerrit Noordzij's "the stroke". The purpose of the image is to show how easy it is to break up a word and make it hard to read by making the space between letters stop relating to the counter-space or space inside letters. I suggest that you look at the white spaces and get them to start to balance. In general your interletter space is too small to be comfortable. As letters get physicaly ( optically really ) larger you can let them come together a bit more and you might need to add space at very small sizes. But in even in these cases this 'rule' still applies just to a different degree. You might have to make your counters smaller ( they are very big) as well as adding space between letters. Doing this will make the massive gap between y+w less bad but you should also fix that - probably by making the angles of the diagonal steeper.

Cassie's picture

I've made some progress, and put together a specimen sheet. I don't have any time to change the letterforms for now, but do you see anything I could change about the specimen to really improve it?

Thanks for all the feedback!

Cassie

Miss Tiffany's picture

Sometimes, in words such as "exotic", there isn't enough flavor to carry the word. I wonder if this isn't one of those times where more is better. For instance, should the o have a tiny loop? Should the n have a tail? Should the b and d have curls? I guess why not a little more character on all the blank letters?

The it ligature isn't working for me. It looks almost like an ampersand when small.
The ri ligature isn't working for me either.

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