Font suggestion for visually impaired

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Jesper Winther's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2007 - 6:15am
Font suggestion for visually impaired
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Hello everybody,
I'm looking for a moden font with superb legibility - it should be made with only that in mind! It's for a design program for visually impaired people. I'd prefer a sans serif although a serif probably would be better...

Any suggestions will be a great help.

Thanx

Jsbr

Laurent Scotta's picture
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Joined: 3 Apr 2007 - 2:09pm
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For a sans, I think you might consider F. Schiavi's Sys

(Editing madness Alert !)

Jesper Winther's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2007 - 6:15am
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It's for paperline and brochures - so it's mostly text - headers and body.

Jesper Winther's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2007 - 6:15am
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Sys is a little bit too "tech" - I'm looking for a more humanistic font.

But thanx anyway ;-)

Richard Hards's picture
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Joined: 14 Oct 2003 - 11:00am
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Craig Eliason's picture
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Joined: 19 Mar 2004 - 1:44pm
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There are some suggestions on this thread.

Brian Jongseong Park's picture
Joined: 15 Mar 2006 - 12:53pm
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I won't elaborate, but Tiresias has its detractors...

I'm thinking any font with suitably open counters, large x-height, and enough differentiation between repeated forms (b/d/p/q), like Fontin Sans, would do the job well. More important than the specific choice of the typeface would be how it is set--size, colour, composition...

Jesper Winther's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2007 - 6:15am
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Thanx a lot for input

Jsbr

Joe Clark's picture
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Joined: 6 May 2005 - 1:23pm
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This is actually rather dangerous ground, with very little in the way of credible research to back up any suggestions. I’m not sure that research is needed just to select a font for a single publication, though; that’s why you’ve come to the experts.

But first, what kind of visual impairment? Do they just need large type (low acuity), or do they have other disorders?


Joe Clark
http://joeclark.org/

Simon Daniels's picture
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Joined: 11 Apr 2002 - 6:37pm
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Joe is right, this is dangerous ground, so anything we contribute will be anecdotal and without scientific foundation.

With that in mind, if a font is legible for text setting at 10pt, then making it larger should be okay. Line-length and leading will likely be the gotchas. Assuming the same viewing distance as an unimpaired reader, you’d put less words on a line. As for leading?

Apart from that the other common sense answer might be to use signage fonts – so your open, humanist sans, might be a good approach. But I’d be nervous about these in text settings – for short passages and headings you should be okay.

Thomas Phinney's picture
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Joined: 3 Sep 2002 - 11:00am
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One can question the Tiresias fonts in general, but their big problem is that all the italics are utterly unusable.

Hmmm, more good blog fodder.

T

Jos Buivenga's picture
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Joined: 19 Nov 2005 - 5:11pm
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I’m thinking any font with suitably open counters, large x-height, and enough differentiation between repeated forms (b/d/p/q), like Fontin Sans, would do the job well.

Thanks for mentioning Fontin Sans, Jongseong. I've heard even more people say (without me asking :-) that Delicious does a great job for people who are visual impaired. Maybe Jesper can give it a test run.

Jelmar Geertsma's picture
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Joined: 14 Sep 2006 - 9:53am
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Sassoon might also be worth looking at. You can download a PDF here. Although it's meant for children, it's designed so that the characters are easily recognizable and distinguishable from each other. In that sense it might also work for people with some form of visual impairment. There are also different versions.

Theunis de Jong's picture
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Joined: 22 Apr 2008 - 5:06pm
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Not one single vote for Doublewide? (g)