>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.4 - Intermediate Level

Bald Condensed's picture

This is how it works:

  • A complete glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the typeface. To win, you need to name both the typeface and the weight.
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge -- a complete glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 x 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can't win the next game.

In case of any disputes, I will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz first. Too easy? Go to the Expert Level Type ID Pop Quiz.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

barthak's picture

That looks very Zapfy, so it must be Palatino Bold ;-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Bart,

yes, that is correct; Palatino by Hermann Zapf!
This sample is taken from the Palatino Linotype OpenType version that ships with Microsoft Windows. It comes with a substantial character set, including Greek and Cyrillic, small caps, ligatures and various figures & fractions … and this glyph, the Numero sign (№).
Note the differing design decisions, across the styles. Also interesting: the inconsistent treatment of the serifs and the contrast axis (the letter ‘N’ and the masculine ordinal indicator ‘º’ are shown for comparison below):

Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic

Now it’s your turn!

barthak's picture

Hi Florian,

nice info! I wonder why Hermann decided as such.

New challenge coming up! I'm not that much of a type guru, but I'll see what I can do :-)

barthak's picture

Here it is!

Apparently, one of the designers originated in Industrial Design and developed an interest in typography, like me! ;-)

barthak's picture

Your thinking is correct ;-)

Take it away!

plumbago's picture

Thanks!

Here is the next one:

Have fun!

barthak's picture

Ooh, I know this one, but I'm not allowed to say anything :'-(

plumbago's picture

What would Hercule Poirot say if he sees a mysterious clue written with this typeface?

plumbago's picture

Well… the name of the font is certainly french but the foundry is from the U.S.

plumbago's picture

Yes Akira! you are correct. The phrase sacre bleu! or sacrebleu!, has been popularized by Agatha Christie's Belgian hero Hercule Poirot.
Joshua Lurie-Terrell from Typographica, chose MVB Sacre Bleu as one of the best typefaces of 2007.

Your turn, Akira!

akira1975's picture

Thank you, Marcelo. :)

Here is the next one:

akira1975's picture

Another glyph of the same font:

akira1975's picture

Another hint:

The designer was involved in a work of a font from House Industries. While the original drawing of the font was from another person, the designer drew the Central European characters and ligatures and defined the spacing and kerning.

akira1975's picture

Yes! Bart, you’re right.
It’s Rumba Small designed by Laura Meseguer. She designed Rumba, which is her final project for the postgraduate course that she took at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in The Hague KABK, in Holland.
And she drew the CE characters and ligatures of Holiday Sans and defined the spacing and kerning of it.

Well done. Your turn now.

barthak's picture

Great!

Here it is:

barthak's picture

I'll post another glyph on monday.

For now I'll say that the serifs remind me of a type of stone used on small roads in the country of the type foundry where this font is published.

barthak's picture

Same font, other glyph:

barthak's picture

The designer is Dutch and also attended the post-graduate course Type and Media at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague - and is a member here on Typophile.

Jan's picture

Hi Bart,
it’s Parry Normal from OurType, designed by Artur Schmal.

barthak's picture

Well done Jan, you are correct!

Your turn :)

Jan's picture

New challenge up:

Florian Hardwig's picture

Could this be the work of a fellow typophile?

Jan's picture

Oh no. Florian again.
Has just been waiting for me to come up with a challenge ;-)

Yes. Fellow typophile indeed.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Well …
is it Preface – the curvaceous sans by Nick Shinn that does without diagonals?
;-)

Jan's picture

... more or less without diagonals – yes.

Absolutely correct, Florian.

The only thing I don’t like about it is the round cap ‘E’.
Looks too much like ‘€’ for my taste.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Thanks!
Here’s the new one:

nina's picture

That might just be the Small Cap letter Q from Aller Display, out of the Aller Sans family designed by Dalton Maag for DMJX, which is free to download at their site.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Wow, Nina, that was a fast one! :D
Absolutely correct. Congratulations, it’s your turn!

nina's picture

Thanks, Florian! :) I was lucky, I just looked at this specimen a few days ago.

So, here's a new one. I hope it's neither too easy nor too obscure :)

nina's picture

Hmm, maybe time for a little hint, I'm beginning to think this may have been a really obscure one. So, the font in question was designed by somebody with whom I share part of my name. And this glyph actually appears in the name of the font.

Jan's picture

Ha! Found it.
It’s the tz-ligature from Mein Schatz, designed by Nina Hons.

nina's picture

Wow … that was quick :)
Congrats. That's extremely correct, except that the weight is missing – but I'll assume you'd spot that anyway ;). Your turn!

Jan's picture

New challenge up:

Florian Hardwig's picture

Huhu Jan! :D
Could this be the bold italic ‘y’ from Veronika Burian’s beautiful Maiola?
F

Jan's picture

Aaaargh ... FLORIAN. Yyessssss. Corrrrrrect.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Well, what can I say? Sorry Jan! ;^)
I have purchased Maiola earlier this year, so the challenge was not that hard.

Here’s the new one:

Florian Hardwig's picture

You might already have guessed it:
This glpyh is not a trebuchet on wheels, but rather a per mille sign (‰).

Florian Hardwig's picture

No guesses? This is from a 4-styles type family with a wide language support, including Greek and Cyrillic script.

Florian Hardwig's picture

There’s a certain reason why this per mille sign looks different from others

nina's picture

Yeah, it looks pretty funny. :) Is it from a monospaced font?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes, Nina, that’s correct!
Here’s another glyph from this font. Same style, smaller scale:

eliason's picture

Is this a Luc de Groot font?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes! Now let’s swap quizes! :D

nina's picture

Ha! It's the per mille sign from Consolas Regular, designed by Luc(as) de Groot for Microsoft. Am I late?

EDIT: Italic of course, not Regular. Ouch.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes, Nina, 1000‰ correct! Sorry Craig, you’re too late …
It is Consolas, ‘the de facto successor of the ubiquitous Courier’. The second glyph is a long s (ſ), as you might have guessed. I don’t know if there’s a frequent need for that character in programming, but ‘all six Western typefaces in the [ClearType] collection were to be developed […] with the same robust glyph set for all’ — LucasFonts.

Did you know that Consolas comes with a number of alternates for some lowercase characters? There are no less than four variations on the ‘r’ – per style, that is. Switching those alternative forms on can change the look of the typeface quite dramatically – which reminded me of Hypatia Sans, and Nick Shinn’s thoughts about its manifold faces. Alas, unlike Hypatia Sans, Consolas’ alternates aren’t organized via stylistic subsets, thus toggling them is more difficult.

Now it’s your turn, Nina!

nina's picture

Yes, Nina, 1000‰ correct!
Haha. Cool!

Did you know that Consolas comes with a number of alternates for some lowercase characters?
Wow. I didn't know that, although I guess something like that is bound to happen when Luc(as) 'Gazillions Of Weights' de Groot is limited to four styles only. ;-) That alternate 'r' in your lower line is pretty, uh, expressive for Consolas!

Looking for a pretty glyph now … will post the new sample shortly.

nina's picture

Here's a new one for your collective amusement (:

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