>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.4 - Intermediate Level

Bald Condensed's picture

This is how it works:

  • A complete glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the typeface. To win, you need to name both the typeface and the weight.
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge -- a complete glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 x 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can't win the next game.

In case of any disputes, I will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz first. Too easy? Go to the Expert Level Type ID Pop Quiz.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Jan's picture

Kickass font. Yeah, I love it. New challenge up soon.

Jan's picture

The designer describes the origin of his typefaces as “combining traditional drawing values with the computer’s mastery of geometric form.”

Jan's picture

Correct Riccardo. Your turn.

riccard0's picture

I have to admit I'm a better googler than I am at identifying typefaces...
Ah, the shame!
I'll post something up as soon as possible.

riccard0's picture

Well, yes, it is a "script small l"...

eliason's picture

I thought it was Moped Sans, but no.

riccard0's picture

Nothing that fancy, alas...

riccard0's picture

Ok, then.
It is a ℓ.
It was designed in 1990, but based on a much older specimen.
It's name is somewhat related to London.

riccard0's picture

Oh, well, there's always someone that kill a thread off. It seems that today it's my turn… ;-)

riccard0's picture

Here's a little bump:


It's a wood type from 1830.

John Lyttle's picture

Is it Poplar—glyph 157? The ℓ would have been glyph 250.

riccard0's picture

Aaaaand we have a winner! :-)

Poplar was designed by Barbara Lind in 1990 for the Adobe Wood Type series from photographs taken by Rob Roy Kelly of the one surviving copy of an 1830 William Leavenworth type specimen book. Leavenworth possessed unusual artistic abilities, and his treatment of the letterform counters as narrow slits made it the only wood type of its kind displayed during the nineteenth century.

Your turn, JL.

John Lyttle's picture

Thank you, Riccardo. Here we go.

John Lyttle's picture

I typically give away too much in the hints. I'll try to mend my ways by saying simply that this is not a 2.

riccard0's picture

It's a Q, I suppose.

John Lyttle's picture

Sorry! A typo. It's a lowercase q.

John Lyttle's picture

This is probably where I get carried away and hint too broadly.
If the glyph in question were a lowercase g, it would look like this:

John Lyttle's picture

The type designer in question has a background in sign making and tests his typefaces on a plotter to avoid problems at the vinyl cutting stage.

John Lyttle's picture

The studio is in Fort Worth, Texas.

eliason's picture

Ah, it's Harliquin (sic). (Which I only got by googling...)

John Lyttle's picture

Yes, Craig. It is Harliquin by Steve Contreras at Signfonts (Art & Sign Studio). I'm with you on the "sic" — I'd rather see this script named Harlequin. Anyway, your turn…

barthak's picture

Cap X, Englische Schreibschrift from Berthold?

eliason's picture

Exactly right, barthak!

barthak's picture

Here's a new one, if anyone is still watching this...

The roughness is because I do not own the face ( it's not the cheapest of fonts ) and the website doesn't provide a bigger sample.

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