Print proofing

Primary tabs

9 posts / 0 new
Last post
froo's picture
Offline
Joined: 2 Jun 2008 - 5:19am
Print proofing
0

Is there something like a print proofing before release of a typeface needed? I have created a sans-serif for general use in short texts and wonder if printing it in a few places would help me in better adjusting the outlines (ink traps etc).
I know that Mr José Scaglione had a speech of such stuff at ATypI. Maybe it is not necessary and I am just too nervous?

Thanks.

Blank's picture
Offline
Joined: 25 Sep 2006 - 2:15pm
0

Some type designers are tested with offset printing before release, especially if they’re designed for low-quality printing. This is one reason that type designers make friends with designers who enjoy beta-testing new type.

Charles Ellertson's picture
Joined: 3 Nov 2004 - 11:00am
0

I don't know much about low-quality printing, but I'd say the same is true if you are going to use high-quality offset printing, between 2,400-3,600 dpi. This is especially important if there is any contrast in the letterforms. You are apt to find that fine lines are too fine. Probably less of an issue with a sans, but maybe not. For instance, new designers sometimes specify a .25-point rule, because it looks fine on the output of a laser printer. They are usually disappointed when the book comes out. It takes a .33-point rule to work with high-resolution offset printing, esp. on uncoated paper.

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

Laser prints can be a deceptive form of print proofing, as toner is very black and has a lot of "gain".
Chances are your typeface will look weaker when printed by offset than on your studio printer.
Not such a problem for sans faces, but quite significant for serif designs.

The other thing is, offset is much sharper.

Jelmar Geertsma's picture
Offline
Joined: 14 Sep 2006 - 9:53am
0

I would try to proof your typeface in as many ways as possible to you.
Laserprint it, inkjet print it, maybe you know someone who likes to test typefaces on an offset job, etc. It's obviously good to know how your design works with a variety of printing methods.

froo's picture
Offline
Joined: 2 Jun 2008 - 5:19am
0

Thank you! I didn't expect so many advices in such a short time!

I guess my problem is just good checking how the type looks in reality, not while displayed. And, as I understand, the only "non-deceptive" solution is a high-quality offset print. (Because below there is a plenty of devices generating more and more odd effects like "it's good to see you, but I won't depend on you").

Charles Ellertson's picture
Joined: 3 Nov 2004 - 11:00am
0

I guess my problem is just good checking how the type looks in reality, not while displayed . . .

Reality is that there are lots of ways to put ink on paper. Another reality is that putting pixels on the screen is an equally important feature of "type." Or even words on an old-fashion TV set, as with advertising.

High-resolution offset printing is only one of these. What to test for -- and what weights & details of a font you decide to offer -- depends on where you perceive a market for it's use.

froo's picture
Offline
Joined: 2 Jun 2008 - 5:19am
0

Right. But since I discovered my home printers produce unrepetitable effects (once a stem is too thin, once - thick), I started to use them for checking glyph outlines in big magnifications only. I am sure I could "dedicate" the typeface for my printers, anyway ;)

Will it be a mistake: to print the typeface on a variety of popular devices, to test the details, angles and weights; if any wrong effect appears frequently - check it; then try printing it on a silkscreen or offset to see how it behaves in better quality?

Jelmar Geertsma's picture
Offline
Joined: 14 Sep 2006 - 9:53am
0

Will it be a mistake: to print the typeface on a variety of popular devices, to test the details, angles and weights; if any wrong effect appears frequently - check it; then try printing it on a silkscreen or offset to see how it behaves in better quality?

I'd say that would be a good idea. If something shows up really weird on laserprint or high-quality inkjet, they will probably also be weird on offset -- even if that is much higher quality.