Can anyone explain step by step th interpolation process in Font Lab?

BrunoMiguel's picture

I am new in font lab and i am learning how to use it, but i dont know how to create a extralight version and then a Extrablack and have the family with all weights...
Can anyone explain step by step how to do it? I have know the two weights...
Best Regards

blank's picture

Read the Multiple Master chapter of the Fontlab manual.

BrunoMiguel's picture

Thanks

Goran Soderstrom's picture

It's a four step process at the beginning:

1. Open your two master weights in FontLab
2. Tools > Blend Fonts
3. Click the option "Build the Multiple Master font"
4. Click OK

The result may vary very much depending on how compatible your outlines are, so you may have to do adjustmenst before blending. But make some trial and errors and you probably get the hang of it.

RachelR's picture

Bruno

Do you need to know how to create a MM font from which you can generate intermediate weights or Interpolation in general ?

Rr

RachelR's picture

I've found Blend Fonts to be a nightmare - I would create a MM font

1. Open your two master weights in FL (eg. Light,Bold)
2. With Light, Tools - Mask - Assign Font Mask, select Bold.
3. Tools - Multiple Master - Define New Axis.
4. Select all glyphs in the Light weight, Tools - Multiple Master - Mask to Master, select Wt1

Glyphs colored green are compatible, those colored red need looking at for contour direction, starting points etc.

blank's picture

In addition to the manual, Adobe has a great ebook about MM and interpolation:
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/font/pdfs/5091.Design_MM_Fonts.pdf

Quincunx's picture

(tracking)

.00's picture

Glyphs colored green are compatible, those colored red need looking at for contour direction, starting points etc.

I wouldn't trust those green cell colors if I were you. Go to the Multiple Master section of Font Info and set the default Weight Vector to something other than 0 or 1000. This will change the display in the Font Window and you will see any interpolation anomalies that might be hiding.

Mark Simonson's picture

Thank you, James! I never noticed that setting before.

(I think a good prerequisite to using FontLab would be proficiency at playing Zork.)

Goran Soderstrom's picture

I’ve found Blend Fonts to be a nightmare - I would create a MM font.
1. Open your two master weights in FL (eg. Light,Bold)
2. With Light, Tools - Mask - Assign Font Mask, select Bold.
3. Tools - Multiple Master - Define New Axis.
4. Select all glyphs in the Light weight, Tools - Multiple Master - Mask to Master, select Wt1

Do this produce a better result? Care to explain why?

As far as I'm concerned, that procedure you describe, must end up with the exact same result as my method. This is also a kind of blending isnt it?

The result in both cases is a MM-font with the light as one master, and the bold as the other.

RachelR's picture

I can't remember the exact problems I had with Blend Fonts, there are posts here about the pros of creating MM fonts over using Blend Fonts.

http://typophile.com/node/56054

Goran Soderstrom's picture

I think what Thomas is referring to in that thread is the fact that it is better to design one weight, make it a MM, and then design the next weight. Because everything will be compatible from the start. But this topic was about having two different weights from the start, and then "Blending" them ;-)

RachelR's picture

I wish I could remember why I stop using Blend fonts - I'm sure it will come to me.

What would be the benefit of making a light weight and making it a MM font and then designing the bold weight.?
As opposed to designing both weights separately then creating the MM font with either Blend Fonts or the method I described.

Can the light weight MM font be used to construct the bold weight.?

Rob O. Font's picture

> it is better to design one weight, make it a MM, and then design the next weight.
>Because everything will be compatible from the start.

If blending, one designs one weight and then designs the other from it, so everything will be compatible from the start.
There is not really any way around putting your "interpolation pants" on "one leg" at a time. ;)

Cheers!

.00's picture

Do this produce a better result? Care to explain why?

Building MM fonts with the Mask-to-Master technique is superior to Blending in so far as Blending will always add additional points even if you set it not to.

Thomas Phinney's picture

Yeah, that's a pretty critical issue....

T

blank's picture

Of course one can always just make sure the masters match, export to UFO, and interpolate in Superpolator. Much faster than dealing with blend or mask-to-master, discounting the time it takes to import UFO files…

Goran Soderstrom's picture

What would be the benefit of making a light weight and making it a MM font and then designing the bold weight.?
As opposed to designing both weights separately then creating the MM font with either Blend Fonts or the method I described.
Can the light weight MM font be used to construct the bold weight.?

In a way, yes, the first master you design can be used to construct the other master(s).

For me, this is much better because everything will be compatible from the start as you place every point at the right place from the start (and it is very easy to see if it is placed wrong aswell). You can see the both masters together all the time, and easy compare details and test the details how they look in the interim weights. If you extrapolate the weights at the same time (with the slider) it is also very easy to see errors. Everything is so visible if you for instance go below the 0, and put in -200 or something.

Further, you can kern them both at the same time, build your sidebearing system so it is compatible, put in all the OT-features, classes etc.

It is also good because you will have the exact same character set through out the family without even thinking specially about it, no glyph will be forgotten.

I always make the fonts as ready as possible in the MM-project, so when i pick out the weights, the only thing to do is to go through the glyphs and make small, small adjustments – and rebuild the kern feature :)

Goran Soderstrom's picture

Building MM fonts with the Mask-to-Master technique is superior to Blending in so far as Blending will always add additional points even if you set it not to.

Ah, great. Didnt know that. Good to know.

Rob O. Font's picture

TerminalD>Blending will always add additional points even if you set it not to.

ThomasP>Yeah, that’s a pretty critical issue....

But since the statement is false... I mean, I've blended 1,000s and 1,000s of characters and none of them come out of the blending process with additional points because I set it not to, and I feed it right.

Cheers!

Goran Soderstrom's picture

Ah, not to forget when speaking of working effective with Multiple Master:

RMX. These are simply the best tools. Period.
http://remix-tools.com/

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