Colliding Accents - Additional vertical metrics ?

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Smitchell's picture
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Joined: 13 Sep 2009 - 12:42pm
Colliding Accents - Additional vertical metrics ?
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I don't know if this is a Additional Vertical metrics matters or some other factor I haven't considered.

I've been extending one of my fonts and adding glyphs with double storey accents like Latin Capital O with circumflex and tilde.

When testing the font in InDesign with auto leading I've noticed that some accents collide

Is it normal to have accent touching like this?

Should I adjust the Additional vertical Metrics, or something else to stop this happening?

Is it acceptable to have this occur with double storey accents?

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I have set the Additional Vertical metrics like this:

1. WinAscent value is the height of the highest point in the font, so this height will cover all the double storey accent.
2. WinDescent is the level that will include all the accents below.
3. Ascender = WinAscent and Descender = WinDeccent
4. TypoLineGap = WinAscent + WinDescent - UPM (1000)
5. Line Gap = 0

Ben Mitchell's picture
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Joined: 12 Aug 2007 - 4:05pm
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I'll be interested to hear what others think as my font has similar issues. I think for languages like Vietnamese with lots of double accents, extra leading is a common solution.

John Hudson's picture
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Joined: 21 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
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InDesign's auto leading is entirely independent of font metrics. It is a percentage of point size (default 120%), which can be edited in InDesign preferences (I usually set mine to 125% as I set a lot of 12/15 text). So changing font vertical metrics will not affect InDesign at all.

Font metrics will affect a lot of other applications though, such as word processors, browsers etc.

Your settings look okay to me.

David Berlow's picture
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Joined: 19 Jul 2004 - 6:31pm
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>I think for languages like Vietnamese with lots of double accents, extra leading is a common solution.

I hope we're all thinking together, that when composing with lots of double accents, extra leading is common practice. ;)

Cheers!