(x) German script on "Das weiße Band" movie poster - Delbanco DS-Kurrent {Jan}

This is something for our German, and more specifically handwriting specialists – I'm looking at you, Florian. ;^)

This script is found on the original movie poster for Michael Haneke's movie Das Weisse Band (The White Ribbon). Can somebody tell me more about this type of handwriting, and is there anything even remotely similar available as a digital font?

I mean, it does look pretty awesome, innit?

Comments

This is really nice. Good luck, I have no idea!

isn't that script style called Sütterlin - the old german script.

Yepp it is called Kurrent. The grandfather of my wife (90) still writes in it (sometimes).

Peter Wiegel has some on his site. MyFonts has two. And here is the english wikipedia entry (the german one has more info).

Sample from the Wikimedia …

There are several available *here*.
Click Deutsche Schreibschrift.

It's called Kurrentschrift or Deutsche Schrift, in English I've seen it called German Blackletter Script too. Do not call this Sütterlin. Many people do, but strictly speaking, Sütterlin is but one variant of this type of script, basically a less-elegant, monoline upright version that was used in schoolbooks (see here).

We've had a bunch of Kurrent stuff recently (which is a good thing – I'm always surprised that it is so little known internationally). There was this wonderful handwritten cookbook that Hanno posted to Typophile; my Flickr page has a few spreads from an old Swiss schoolbook featuring both Fraktur & Kurrentschrift (not Sütterlin), and a sign painter's version of the Kurrent alphabet from a 1930s lettering manual. Some additional discussion and links in those Flickr threads.

Oh, Gerhard Helzl has some digitized fonts, too. See samples of them in his Typespecimen-PDF. Link is the red sentence in the middle of the site called »Großer Fraktur-Prospekt hier herunterladbar.«

Attention: The page is graphically heavily disturbing, but the digitization of the fonts should be okay, people say.

Direct link to the PDF: here. See the Kurrent samples on page 12.

Wow, I see you don’t need my help! :-) Impressive.

Not much to add but the actual ID: I think it is DS-Kurrent from Delbanco. It is a clean rendition; although the imperfect connection from t to (long) s in ‘deutsche’ gives away the fact that it is a font.

Last addition: I read from Yves’ sample: »Eine deutsche Kindergeschichte« (A german children’s story)

Yves, when you write up your ScreenFonts feature, note that the movie title actually is spelled Das weiße Band (no title case in German; SS → ß in mixed case).

Yves, you could have found samples that were similar in Part 9 (Everyday Handwriting) of the Script Font ID Guide. (There is another on the following page).

- Mike Yanega

Delbanco is actually what I had linked to.

Jan, apologies! I missed that link, despite the asterisks. Credit is all yours.

Whoa, this is so great! :^)

> (…) samples that were similar in Part 9 (Everyday Handwriting) of the Script Font ID Guide.

Oh, I didn't look in your Script Guide this time because the script was so alien to me I didn't even know where to start. And I would never have expected to find it amongst "Everyday Handwriting" scripts. :^P

> Yves, when you write up your ScreenFonts feature, note that the movie title actually is spelled Das weiße Band (no title case in German; SS → ß in mixed case).

I've already corrected it in my draft. ;^)

My first impression was that maybe Voluta had come from this style of lettering. Voluta isn't quite so angular, but does share some similarities.
http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/adobe/voluta-script/

My first impression was that maybe Voluta had come from this style of lettering.

Yes, exactly. The idea was to design a script that looks like Kurrent but is readable to contemporary eyes. However for Voluta samples from the 17th and 18th century were used as reference. ”Eine deutsche Kindergeschichte“ looks like 19th or early 20th century.