(x) 'Sparrows' silent movie intertitle - various {gang}

dot_s's picture

I am hoping there is a digital font similar--if not identical--to this intertitle from the 1926 Mary Pickford film 'Sparrows'...

(I am quite fond of the lc 'a' and 'e'.)

Sparrows Intertitle

edit: I typically use MeyerTwo for my intertitle reproductions, but this one is quite different

John Nolan's picture

I'd have a look through the stuff at http://www.nicksfonts.com/.

dot_s's picture

It seems that all the fonts I crave can be found at Nick's...

Thank you so much for your quick reply!

Diner's picture

Actually, Ray Larabie has a better version of this 'silent movie' font he created just for this purpose called Silentina: http://www.typodermic.com/fonts/23.html

Stuart :D

dot_s's picture

Oh my word, Silentina.

"I do so sweetly apologize, Mr MeyerTwo, though it does seem you have been replaced.'

Mark Simonson's picture

Ray's Silentina appears to be based partly on an old BB&S face called Pastel. I learned about Pastel when a guy contacted me a year or two ago wanting to know what font was used for the intertitles in a particular film he was restoring. Silentina Film matches the intertitles this guy showed me pretty well. The main difference from Pastel is in the caps and punctuation.

dot_s's picture

I am unsure if any one is interested, or--perhaps--this is old hat: That Silent Film Intertitle Font

aardvrk's picture

Yes, I was curious. Thank you. Btw, I have been looking for silent film era type that has a swash lc 'r', 'v' and 'w'. I may have to scan a sketch and post it in a new thread... :-)

Mark Simonson's picture

I am unsure if any one is interested, or--perhaps--this is old hat: That Silent Film Intertitle Font

Well, small world. That's the guy who contacted me about the font. I wondered if Silentina was more than a coincidence. Those scans of Pastel he has on that page were sent to him by me. I was too busy at the time to do anything with it. Obviously, he got tired of waiting for me to do something with it and had better luck with Ray. Oh, well.

dot_s's picture

I do apologize for using this thread as a personal reference for intertitle look-a-likes, though Cantoria also seems to have intertitle qualities.

Edit: I would like to express my deepest gratitude for passing along the friend known as Silentina. Sixteen hours and twenty-four dollars later, I could be described as participating in the Inter Fondness of Titled Bliss.

ahleman's picture

I'm currently working on titling a silent film myself, so I've been studying the various types used. Silentina is an excellent match for the type which was commonly used, but there were others. I've seen Parsons and Hunt Speedball lettering used often as well. Camelot Oldstyle is also an excellent candidate, as well as the Meyer and Cantoria already mentioned. Some, if not many, silent films had hand-lettered titles, often done in the style of Fred Cooper.

ahleman's picture

Post Monotone, or a variation on it, also has the right feel, IMHO.

dot_s's picture

While not worthy of Mark Simonson's ever excellent 'Typecasting', it bothers me to no end that in the restoration of G.W. Pabst's 'Diary of a Lost Girl' (released by Kino Int'l), Glorietta was used in the descriptive intertitles, as well as the usage of Cezanne to represent Thymiane's handwriting.

I just needed an appropriate place to vent my irritation.

dot_s's picture

Many thanks for all these options, Andrew. I do suspect that I would seem obsessed if every reproduction I produced was set in Silentina.

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