Givry type

The bâtarde flamande is a style of writing used predominantly in France and present-day Belgium in the 15th century. The style shares an ancestry with other writing styles traditionally grouped as blackletter—fraktur, textura, rotunda, and schwabacher. It had evolved, however, into an æsthetic far removed from its relatives.

While high-contrast in nature, the bâtarde flamande is more delicate and dynamic than the austere and condensed fraktur and textura. Quick curves lack the rigidity of the schwabacher and rotunda. Flair through swashes is thematic, as are the variations in letterforms.

The flowing rhythm, achieved through a letterform axis that is overall slightly rightward, is most noticable in the hallmark f and long s. Round forms are fused together for economy of space. It is a writing hand that, with its syncopation and fluidity, produces a vibrance uncharacteristic of other blackletters.

While suitable as an elegant and energetic display face, Givry was conceived for setting continuous text. The result of many refinements and adjustments is the preservation of the style’s irregular nature, as well as a consistency that continuous-text typography requires. Carefully researched and developed in OpenType format for a wealth of typographic features and support for more than forty languages, Givry is neither derivative nor experimental, but historically accurate.

John Hudson's picture

In terms of writing technique, how are the hairline strokes in the capitals created? I'm guessing, by looking at that D, that the pen is tilted so that only the corner of the nib is used. If so, this is a nice European example of the technique that is central to the nasta'liq style of Perso-Arabic script, which I think may constitute a 4th stroke construction model in a Noordzijan analysis.

Nick Shinn's picture

In terms of Typophile posting, this advertisement belongs in the Release forum.

John Hudson's picture

Yes, the Release forum would be the appropriate location.

Florian Hardwig's picture

I’ve moved this thread to the Release forum.

Nick Shinn's picture

Thanks.

**

It's brilliant.
Who would have thought that such an "accurate" ******* bastard could be so legible, in this day and age?!
Don't be so coy Veronika, who designed it?
And can we have a link to a PDF specimen?

eliason's picture

Enchanting letterforms!
Is this spacing (ligating?) of the /e/s intentional?

Following on John Hudson's question, how does a pen come up with this shape?

dan_reynolds's picture

The designer is Tom Grace.

Arno Enslin's picture

Following on John Hudson's question, how does a pen come up with this shape?

I think, that John was regarding to the thin end stroke (with the loop), which is vertically crossing the D, but without a change of the width.

Givry is really great. Pure beauty, but very legible. But according to the info on the website of typetogether it was released two years ago.

Who would have thought that such an "accurate" ******* bastard could be so legible, in this day and age?!

Yes. It really is surprising, that it is so legible for a person (me), that is primary experienced in reading Antiquas.

(Burgundica is likewise impressive. Unfortunately on a very different price level. [Both typefaces are very different.])

gaultney's picture

In terms of writing technique, how are the hairline strokes in the capitals created? I'm guessing, by looking at that D, that the pen is tilted so that only the corner of the nib is used.

Yes, that's the technique, and one that is surprisingly common in European tradition. It can be seen in everything from 6th cen. rustics to gothics from 1000 years later. Some bâtardes use it gloriously, and usually with a gradual thinning of stroke, which brings up:

Following on John Hudson's question, how does a pen come up with this shape?

It is said that most bâtardes were written with a very flexible pen (quill), and so the thinning of these strokes are due to a release of pressure. That's not always the case, as very fine bâtardes can be written even with a stiffer broad pen. In those cases the thinning is typically due to a lifting of one side of the pen. It doesn't usually require a twisting technique, although that can be in the mix.

This lifting is particularly effective when writing fast strokes. Bâtarde, with all its mannerisms, is thought to have been written slowly. That's probably true of the more florid, formal examples, but as a cursive gothic it really developed with speed and practicality in mind. That meant less twisting, fewer strokes, more connections, etc. Here are two quick examples of strokes written at a relatively high speed with a very stiff pen and a constant pen angle - the first one shows lifting of the right side of the nib, whereas the second is done with a quick downward flick of the wrist, effectively lifting the left corner.

BTW - well done Tom!

viko's picture

I must apologise for the misleading article here. Givry, by Tom Grace, has indeed been released two years ago. The person who posted this entry misunderstood my instructions and i saw this only today.

Should it be deleted or posted somewhere else?

Again, my apologies,
Best
Veronika

eliason's picture

Thanks, Victor!
Are there examples of digital calligraphic fonts that incorporate a rougher edge on the sides of the strokes that are lifted?

gaultney's picture

I don't know of any, but they probably exist. If I want a rough, calligraphic look I usually use a pen - or find a fellow calligrapher who can do the needed style better than I. :-)

Arno Enslin's picture

@ Veronika

There is no need to apologize for those things. You can release such a beauty a dozen of times. That’s better than releasing a dozen of uglinesses.

tgrace's picture

Thanks, everyone.

I understand the stroke variations to come from the corner of the nib, a variation in pressure, some light rotation, or a combination of the three.

@Eliason: the overlapping of round forms is intentional, based on manuscripts. It's tucked away in an OT feature, for those that want this effect.

eliason's picture

Thanks Tom, and let me add my (belated) congratulations on this beautiful font!

Nick Shinn's picture

@ Victor ... one that is surprisingly common ...

But no surprise to a calligrapher, because it's always been the coolest trick.

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