Money illustrating texture, embossing and lettering style tips

VisualPollution's picture

Hello everyone!
I know this is not the right place to post my question, but I was wondering if anyone knows any tips or trick or tool in order to make vector “money-like” background decoration, and type?

Image reference:

http://www.freeworldalliance.biz/Pictures/1DollarBillPlain.jpg

Or something very Obey style:

http://pakalert.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/obey-giant-hostile-takeover-black1.jpg

Let me know!
Thank you so much!

nina's picture

2 quick thoughts, without knowing what exactly you're trying to do:

1) For those typical complex line patterns, try searching for "guilloche".*
See for example this: http://www.subblue.com/projects/guilloche

2) Type: Check out LTR Federal
http://www.letterror.com/catalog/fed/order.html

* Edit: There are fonts for that too – see this thread:
http://typophile.com/node/68483

Tomi from Suomi's picture

And do not forget Federal by LettError!

ill sans's picture

The "guilloche" is a great toy! Thanks, Nina!

VisualPollution's picture

Thank you all, guys!

1985's picture

Good link (guilloche), Nina.

nina's picture

I can't take credit for finding that great link tho – Kosal Sen posted it over on the older thread I linked to above. That was the first time I ever saw that word :)

VisualPollution's picture

Digging on web, I found a lot of great links and materials about engraving technique:

Starting from a engraving forum:
http://www.handengravingforum.com/showthread.php?t=1151

And a couple of photoshop plug-in for great engraving effects:

1) Andromeda Software: http://www.andromeda.com/main/cutline.php#
2) Engraver II Plug-in http://www.alphaplugins.com/products/products.php?menu=get_prod_id&prod_id=2
3) Panocticum Engraver: http://www.panopticum.com/ps/engraver/engraver.shtml

Engraving Tutorials:
http://www.inkart.com/pages/Tutorial/index.html

Example of Money Texture:
http://www.alphaplugins.com/4images/details.php?image_id=283

SecuriDesign for CorelDraw:
http://www.oberonplace.com/products/securidesign/index.htm

Gilloche Pattern:
http://www.guard-soft.com/CD_Catalog/volume_01.html

Cheers!

1985's picture

I wonder how one would go about creating a guilloche before computers? A sort of spirograph engraving?

Theunis de Jong's picture

Yes; using lots of rotographic hardware. The precise combination, tooth count, and sizes of the rotors was, in true Enigma fashion, a state secret, intended to make it hard for counterfeiters.

(OT: anyone else seeing this at the bottom of the Post Comment box after installing the latest update of Safari?)

1985's picture

The precise combination, tooth count, and sizes of the rotors was, in true Enigma fashion, a state secret, intended to make it hard for counterfeiters.

That's fascinating. I can only imagine how complicated it was to set up, register and so on.

Steven Acres's picture

Sounds like it'd be fun. I want one. :)

Theunis de Jong's picture

A quickie: a 2-rotor guilloché, in Javascript, for a fairly modern InDesign. Vary the initial radii and play with the inner-loop formulae to get different effects.

app.activeDocument.zeroPoint = [ app.activeDocument.documentPreferences.pageWidth/2, app.activeDocument.documentPreferences.pageHeight/2 ];
r1 = 80;
r2 = 5;
for (o=0; o<360; o+=5)
{
ln = app.activeDocument.graphicLines.add();
path = [];
for (i=0; i<360; i++)
{
cx = r1*Math.sin(i*Math.PI/180);
cy = r1*Math.cos(i*Math.PI/180);
xp = cx + (r2+o/30)*Math.sin(5*(o+i)*Math.PI/180);
yp = cy + (r2+o/45)*Math.cos(5*(o+i)*Math.PI/180);
path.push ([xp, yp]);
}
ln.paths[0].entirePath = path;
ln.paths[0].pathType = PathType.CLOSED_PATH;
c = app.activeDocument.colors.add ({space:ColorSpace.RGB, colorValue:[255*Math.min(1,Math.max(0,Math.sin(o*Math.PI/180))), 255*Math.min(1,Math.max(0,Math.cos(o*Math.PI/180))), 255]});
ln.strokeWeight = 0.1;
ln.strokeColor = c;
}

Theunis de Jong's picture

Here is a more "official" version, using the formulaes from Wolfram on hypotroichoids. a is the "outer", main radius, b is the "inner" rotating radius, and h is the thickness of the outer rim.

Not explained on that web page, but the number of rotations to get a complete curve seems to be the greatest common factor of a and b -- I discovered that empirically so I might be wrong about that.

The number of points in the entire path may be greater than InDesign can comfortably handle, so it gets defined into runs of 10,000 pts each.


app.activeDocument.zeroPoint = [ app.activeDocument.documentPreferences.pageWidth/2, app.activeDocument.documentPreferences.pageHeight/2 ];
a = 80;
b = 13;
h = 20;
path = [];
nLoop = b/greatestCommonFactor(a,b);
p = null;
for (t=0; t<=nLoop*360; t+= 0.5)
{
x = (a - b) * Math.cos(t*Math.PI/180) + h * Math.cos (t*((a - b)/b)*Math.PI/180);
y = (a - b) * Math.sin(t*Math.PI/180) - h * Math.sin (t*((a - b)/b)*Math.PI/180);
path.push ([x,y]);
if (path.length > 10000)
{
if (p == null)
{
p = app.activeDocument.graphicLines.add().paths[0];
p.parent.strokeWeight = 0.1;
} else
p = p.parent.paths.add();
p.entirePath = path;
path = [ [x,y] ];
}
}
if (path.length > 1)
{
if (p == null)
{
p = app.activeDocument.graphicLines.add().paths[0];
p.parent.strokeWeight = 0.1;
} else
p = p.parent.paths.add();
p.entirePath = path;
}
function greatestCommonFactor (x,y)
{
while (y != 0)
{
w = x % y;
x = y;
y = w;
}
return x;
}

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