First attempt at hand-lettering a logo for myself

bstrom's picture

I've never done anything like this before, but I want to learn as much as I can from this little project. I'm trying to come up with a nice handwritten-script logo for myself. I may end up using it, but I'm more interested in learning and practice at this point.

I'm anxious to hear your thoughts! I want to improve construction, flow, and consistency if possible (and I'm sure it is).

Cheers
Brendan

bstrom's picture

Here's another sketch. Working at developing some stroke contrast. Not sure how to do that with the 'm', so I left it alone for the time being.

typerror's picture

Brendan

See if you can find some books on lettering... Doyald Young's book would be an excellent start. Just LOOK, OBSERVE and then do.

Good luck.
Michael

bstrom's picture

Thanks for the helpful thoughts, typerror. I will look for some books. Until then, here's another sketch. My goal is to keep posting sketches to this thread as a way to keep me regularly attempting letterforms. The "m" is downright awful.

bstrom's picture

This is my university's library catalog. I don't suppose anyone would be willing to find me a really solid book that my university carries?

http://griffin.wsu.edu/search/Y?SEARCH=lettering&SORT=D&searchscope=12

bstrom's picture

I was looking at some other lettering, particularly this. I noticed that in this case, the contrast of the stroke occurs its translation on the downstroke. I'm sure I'm failing in my attempts to sound like I know what I'm talking about. In any case, I tried to mimic what I observed. The 'b' doesn't quite fit.

typerror's picture

Both of Michael Harvey's books are good instructional books on just the sort of exercise you are embarking on (drawing letters) except they do not, that I remember, deal with "scripts." The techniques, though, are there. Johnston's is a good historical resource.

Go to Myfonts and look at scripts, set your name/logo in them, and ponder :-)

Good luck.
Michael

sggladden's picture

I'd recommend trying a calligraphy pen. It'll give you a much better insight into scripts in general. Hand scripting is like playing the piano it takes lots and lots of practice. Of course as a side benefit it's a really good way to impress women ; )

.00's picture

Only use an edged pen if you want edged-pen letterforms. Yours look like they want to be a formal connecting script. An edged pen will not help you with that.

Doyald Young's books can give you a major insight into formal script.

You are killing yourself with this with the r and s. The two most difficult letters to draw and harmonize in a script. Most of a formal script can be created with 3 or 4 main shapes with exceptions for the r and s. And sometimes the x. Draw a set of parallel lines that delineate the angle of the script. Draw an i, l, n to match that angle with whatever connecting stroke you desire. Then go on to the o. Once you have an o and an l, you are on your way to a d. Cut the top off of the d and you have an a. The b will be different. Ultimately it is all modular, with variations that give it flavor.

Remember: nnoonon

Straight stroke, curved stroke, connecting stroke.

Start there and eventually you will be ahead of the game.

The uppercase is an entirely different matter. But modular just the same.

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