Globe and Mail: last week of current design

Primary tabs

27 posts / 0 new
Last post
Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
Globe and Mail: last week of current design
0

The present iteration of "Canada's National Newspaper" has one week to go, so it's the last chance to read this rather unusual newspaper design.

Alex Klages's picture
Offline
Joined: 1 Jan 2007 - 10:37am
0

Are you involved in the next iteration, Nick?

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

Yes, still a good client.

William Berkson's picture
Offline
Joined: 26 Feb 2003 - 11:00am
0

Look forward to your take on the before and after, then!

Alex Klages's picture
Offline
Joined: 1 Jan 2007 - 10:37am
0

Indeed. Will keep my eyes open at the newsstands (though here the Globe only arrives in the late afternoon, meaning I don't tend to buy it; I read it online).

Todd Macfie's picture
Offline
Joined: 18 Jun 2009 - 4:25pm
0

*excited*

Can I expect the weekend edition to be different? Or Monday morning?

I assume this has nothing to do with the new (/old) ownership.

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

October 1st is the launch date, so today is the last "7", and tomorrow the last weekend edition of the present format.

I assume this has nothing to do with the new (/old) ownership.

Right. It's been two years in the works.
The main factor is new presses, enabling full color throughout, which they don't have at the moment, and the option to print (some sections) on coated stock. And the size of the standard north American web press roll has been further reduced.

Generally, the paper paper is becoming more magazine-y, as much of the traditional news function has gone to broadcast media and online. Redesigns also spike readership and generate buzz with advertisers, as well as addressing many content-driven issues.

James Montalbano's picture
Joined: 18 Jun 2003 - 11:00am
0

I suppose you need a Brioschi.

Todd Macfie's picture
Offline
Joined: 18 Jun 2009 - 4:25pm
0

Wouldn't it be amazing if they did something revolutionary, like an actual books section on the weekend?

I say this having just bought Jose Saramago's new book after reading the weekend New York Times book review, and after having bought Franzen's new book from the review the weekend before, and after having bought David Mitchel's new book from Dave Egger's review of it, and so on.

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

I suppose you need a Brioschi.

Well, the layout and typography are a bit more traditional this time around, so I don't think we'll be seeing quite so many letters to the editor from outraged design professionals.

Except for those who aren't quite au fait with this trendy slab serif thing.

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

Wouldn't it be amazing if they did something revolutionary, like an actual books section on the weekend?

They used to until a couple of years ago, then it was folded into a regular format "Ideas + books" feature section, for economic reasons. But it's still several pages of bona fide reviews.

In general, people (especially advertisers) are more interested in "Wheels" than "Books".

Joe Clark's picture
Offline
Joined: 6 May 2005 - 1:23pm
0
Reed Reibstein's picture
Offline
Joined: 23 Feb 2006 - 7:22pm
0

Below is a sneak peek out of the Society for News Design's Denver conference, via @jasonachiu.

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

Joe, there are bold italics of those fonts, but they probably went astray somewhere between the back end and the front end, due to the complexities of font naming.
I had noticed that, but mentally grouped it with other things that it was impossible to fix due to their pagination system, such as the fractions. Although I should have mentioned it to them, rather than waiting for them to ask me to try and help them fix it. Muy bad.

If you thought it needed to be fixed, why didn't you draw it to my attention, or would you rather just nurse your grudge and relish being the smart alec pointing out the incompetence of others?

Anyway, looks like there's not going to be much sans serif from now on.

K Cerulean Pease's picture
Joined: 19 Oct 2003 - 5:03pm
0

I note that the pull quotes in that set are in bold italic, and use regular italic to set apart titles. Whether that's a good idea or not, obviously the bold italic exists and they have access to it.

Joe Clark's picture
Offline
Joined: 6 May 2005 - 1:23pm
0

Nick: The answer to your question is “yes and no.”

I had no way of knowing you were still involved and had no reason to ask. It is a question of copy-editing, not type design. The latter may be part of the solution, but it is not the root problem.

Also, I don’t like your attitude either. As with you, this means nothing.

John Lyttle's picture
Offline
Joined: 24 Jun 2009 - 1:13pm
0

I subscribe to the Globe and look forward to it almost as much as my morning coffee. I'm trying not to be a stick in the mud, but I'm worried about this new development.

Here are some drawbacks to the redesign:

1. I am distressed to hear that "there's not going to be much sans serif from now on." The sans serif type on the pages of the Globe is one of the big reasons I like this newspaper;

2. A recent call to customer service informed me that the delays in delivery that an open letter warned about will actually mean that the paper will arrive at about 10 a.m. That doesn't suit my needs for a daily morning paper, so I have arranged to put my subscription on hold until the delivery can be made early again (a week or two, from what I was told);

3. What's wrong with black and white pages? There's nothing with more contrast that black on white. It's legible and most photojournalism worth its salt looks great in grayscale; and

4. If the above sneak peek is a good indication of what's to come, there will be less news content on the front page. The trend of selling the inside of the paper on the cover is not so new, but it doesn't mean I have to like it either. The Globe's new look is not as extreme as what I get with my other daily newspaper subscription (The Winnipeg Free Press — image below from Wikipedia), but in my opinion, it's not as good a front page as what the Globe has been doing for the past few years.

With that said, I am pleased to see that the Globe and Mail is "still a good client" of Shinntype, so I will try to be optimistic.

John Lyttle's picture
Offline
Joined: 24 Jun 2009 - 1:13pm
0

Final day for the “unusual newspaper design.” Funny that the top news is “A solemn end to her five-year reign.” Au revoir, Governor General Michaëlle Jean. Salut, Globe Sans.

John Lyttle's picture
Offline
Joined: 24 Jun 2009 - 1:13pm
0

What’s the verdict this time? The previous redesign of the Globe and Mail is discussed here: http://typophile.com/node/33247

Today’s redeisgn is shown here: http://j.mp/Globe_redesign

Todd Macfie's picture
Offline
Joined: 18 Jun 2009 - 4:25pm
0

I read it today. I like the new size, it's comfortable.

Wow, the cap G is slim in proportion.

But nice work Mr Shinn. I would love to read a report of the process, or to see the specifications which are probably proprietary.

I'll think more about it with the weekend edition.

John Savard's picture
Offline
Joined: 23 Nov 2009 - 8:42pm
0

The new design has an obvious flaw that has been pointed out - less news on the front page - but that would be the client's choice, not Mr. Shinn's.

I noted that in the discussion of the previous design, the fact that the columns were narrow, resulting in frequent hyphenation, was somehow blamed on Nick Shinn's typeface design. I'm assuming I just didn't read the post carefully enough. (If the typeface hadn't been condensed, I suppose it could have been blamed in a way, but still...)

I can't judge the design well enough to give it the praise it deserves, but at least I can avoid giving it blame it does not deserve!

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

...less news on the front page...

This is a recognition that people get their immediate news broadcast or online, not in print.
So the role of the newspaper now is to provide more in the way of commentary and opinion, and the kind of graphic quality and experience that is special in print. A daily magazine, as it were.

Marc Oxborrow's picture
Offline
Joined: 26 Apr 2002 - 2:17pm
0

I haven't seen it in person, but this Portuguese newspaper appears to take the idea of newspaper-as-daily-magazine to a new level:

http://www.spd.org/2010/10/portugals-i-newspaper.php

John Hudson's picture
Offline
Joined: 21 Dec 2002 - 11:00am
0

Nick: This is a recognition that people get their immediate news broadcast or online, not in print.

Well, I do now, but that is in part because I can't get it from the Globe any longer. I used to buy the Globe 2-3 times per week, usually to read over lunch and usually after having scanned the front page to see what news stories were being given major coverage. Since the redesign, I scan the front page and wonder 'Why would I buy this? I can read the news on my phone.'

David Owen Morgan's picture
Joined: 4 May 2010 - 7:07am
0

@Nick: wonder if you’ve written / will be writing about process anywhere? Specifically interested in possible Cartier influence on Canada’s National Newspaper, the relevance of Canadian typography and unique identities designed for Canadian brands.

Any insight appreciated. Congrats on the project.

Todd Macfie's picture
Offline
Joined: 18 Jun 2009 - 4:25pm
0

RE: Joe Clark and the not-Bold Italic.

They still revert to regular italic in bold blocks of text. I've spotted it a number of times, but I'm sorry to say the paper went into the bin before I could scan it.

Nick Shinn's picture
Offline
Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
0

David, no plans to write about process, at the moment, except in the next few minutes.
No Cartier influence.
It was David Pratt's idea in the 2007 redesign to adopt an ultra-modernist layout, and balance its austerity against old style/humanist faces, rather than the usual "moderns" used for newspapers in North America.
The Globe sees itself as a leader, although perhaps more willing to buck trends in the 2007 redesign than this year's.
The 2010 redesign, by Adrian Norris, adapted the Pratt faces to an all-serif look, with optical sizes.
So those fonts are just my idea of what the old style could look like in a newspaper.

Of course, I think it would be nice if Canadian typographers used more Canadian fonts (instead of Helvetica and H&FJ), but that's the way things are, and as the majority of my font sales are to the US, who am I to complain?! I do get the occasional Canadian commission -- although not as many as Canada Type, for some reason :-)