Provisionally titled Rollerscript until I can think of a better name!

Nick Cooke's picture

This is something I am working on at the moment

After my last script Olicana, written with a steel nib and ink, I thought I'd go more up-to-date with a Ball Pentel, but still with the mostly connected feel. I hope to achieve the authentic handwritten look of Olicana with this one, implementing lots of ligatures and some contextual alternates for certain characters. Or I might have individual characters as stylistic sets so that one or more characters may be substituted. I shall probably have Rough and Smooth styles also.

I am not sure about keeping the 'lumpy' bits in the smooth style or smoothing them out.

typerror's picture

Alright Nick, step back from the ledge! HA... handwriting anonymous could be of some help :-)Go for it... it has great potential.

I like the lumpy bits!

Michael

typerror's picture

The caps look great!

Frode Bo Helland's picture

This is amazing, Nick!

eliason's picture

I like the lumpy bits!

Me too!

riccard0's picture

I like the lumpy bits!

Thirdied.

William Berkson's picture

I think your Olicana is really great, because it's so distinctive. It has masculine strength and a lot of energy, which is very unusual with cursive scripts. This has it too, go for it!

don dada's picture

the "lumpy" weight takes it away -- this is ace.

Nick Cooke's picture

Thanks everybody, I've been adding stuff. An update coming soon.

Like your occupation Don.

Nick Cooke's picture

Here's an updated sample with some ligatures and contextual alternates:

don dada's picture

beautiful -- a question/suggestion: how about a "vi" ligature? when i happen to write it, i never lift the pen.

cerulean's picture

I feel the N is unclear. The right side sweeps up and then down again, which gives me the impression of a sloppy M.

Nick Cooke's picture

I can't see that at all - it looks like an N to me, especially in the context of a word. I don't read OPPOMEMT.

jabez's picture

The similarity of the 'u' and 'n' glyphs might be a problem. I've had a client reject the use of FF Market because of this. Names can be especially problematic.

"Jung", "Chung" and "Gunnar" in FF Market:

eliason's picture

FWIW, I can kind of see the M/N potential confusion.
When you write an N quickly, do you write the two verticals with downstrokes? I write a downstroke, then the diagonal down and the second vertical up.

William Berkson's picture

I don't see any problem with the N. The new version feels a little less lively, but I have no idea why.

R.'s picture

Please do an alternate ‘N’. Everything else is so nice.

Nick Cooke's picture

R, the latest mystery person to chime in about the N. So I've altered it.

William Berkson's picture

I think I figured out the difference in my impression of some of the posts as more lively than others. The bigger ones show the roughness more, and that adds a bit of drama. In any case, wonderful work!

Nick Cooke's picture

Thanks William, - Yes, it's quite surprising, as it really is pretty rough, but hardly noticeable at small sizes.

eliason's picture

I think some dingbats would be useful - arrows, smiley/frowny faces, a heart, etc.
It'd be cool if you could work out a way to get an in-character underline of words as a possibility, but I suppose anything varying from pure horizontal would be tricky if not impossible...?

Oh, and I like the new N :-)

Nick Cooke's picture

Thanks Craig. I figured out how to do crossings out for Olicana, so underlines should be similar in principle, except lower. Horizontal would be OK, but a slight upward angle from left to right might be better.

I was thinking of including emoticons, arrows in different directions, stars, moons, suns, hearts etc, (even though they're a bit 'girly' for my liking) - I'm not being sexist here, it's just that I'm a bloke from Northern England, (although not particularly macho - I'm a type designer after all) ;^)

R.'s picture

Happy now :^)

don dada's picture

nick, you've cooked up (being a lawyer, i am entitled to lame puns -- sue me.) something wonderfully edgy there -- but i'm sure you don't need me to tell you that. top notch, and i appreciate the ligature (note that i didn't complain about the n and m! haha).

Frode Bo Helland's picture

How did you do the crossings in Oliciana, Nick?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Nice one, Nick-

For me, with Suomi Hand, the hardest part was where to stop with the ligatures. Good luck. :·)

riccard0's picture

Nice emoticon!
I second the idea of the underline. Maybe it could be useful to style-link it to italic?

Nick Cooke's picture

style-link it to italic

Huh? What does that even mean? It's just one style - it won't be style-linked to anything.

Nick Cooke's picture

Glad you're all liking it so far.

Tomi - I had that problem with Olicana, but with this one I've used liga and calt combined to give more variety without doing so many ligs (even though there are still lots).

Frode - here is your tutorial for the day:

The crossings out were done by having crossings out in 8 lengths from short to long. Each of these is then placed to the left of the left side bearing in the glyph window, thus placing it over the previously typed characters. The width of the crossing glyph is set quite narrow - (198 in this case) so that it can be selected if need be. You can see in the picture how many spaces are needed to make the Crossing_7 glyph appear after the word. The Crossing_7 glyph is selected in the picture and you can see the width is narrow and the glyph itself is to the left.

I hope that is clear enough - it may become clearer if you study the metrics.

riccard0's picture

style-link it to italic

Huh? What does that even mean? It's just one style - it won't be style-linked to anything.

I meant, since in handwriting underline is used for emphasis, in a similar manner as italic is used setting roman text, it could have been nice to have the style link, so to make it easier working with existing text.
One example using generic serif and script fonts:

Nick Cooke's picture

Oh, I see. Er.... I wouldn't know how to do that, especially with drawn lines of differing lengths. I tried selecting a word in InDesign and clicking underline, but it just looks like your Bradley Hand example; ie. a straight line, not 'wobbly hand-drawn'.

riccard0's picture

I tried selecting a word in InDesign and clicking underline, but it just looks like […] a straight line

Yes, I know. I don’t know if it’s possible to style-link to underline (and certainly it isn’t with double underline). That’s why I suggested italic, even if it isn’t philologically correct (but, to some degree, semantically it is).

Nick Cooke's picture

Nope, still don't understand.

cerulean's picture

(Happy Now.)

You could achieve what riccard0 is thinking of by making a copy of the font that underlines every word (there should be a number of ways to do this with contextual alternates and get a natural look to the underlines) and calling it the italic font. But I'm not sure if that's really the most practical solution for users wanting to add underlines.

Nick Cooke's picture

Hmmm... I'm pretty sure that wouldn't be the best use of my time. I'll probably do the underlines as detailed above for the crossing out. It's not something I'm overly concerned about anyway, it's just a little extra add-on.

cerulean's picture

I think you're right. But it would be cool to trigger it with a simple feature that interprets _this_ which is a common computer shorthand.

Nick Cooke's picture

I've done lengths from 1 to 9 available from the glyphs palette.

don dada's picture

the last sample looks very much like graffiti. nice.

dezcom's picture

I still like your original N best ;-)

Nick Cooke's picture

Grrrrrrrr!

dezcom's picture

Nick, it is your font and your handwriting; do it your way ;-)

Nick Job's picture

Wow, you're on fire, Nick. Get in!

For me, the more roughness you have, the more obvious the repetition when it occurs. This is clearly mitigated by an increase in ligatures and contextuals.

Enjoy tobogganning in Wharfedale!

Nick Cooke's picture

I have now added some emoticons:

Nick, I'm a wimp - I can't stay out there too long, I don't think it has ever been colder here.

Edit. Chris, I have redone the N as I have discovered from past experience that if there is a perceived 'problem' with a character potential customers may use another typeface or even worse do their own alterations. I have see quite a few really bad replacement 'r's of one of my other scripts - Gizmo. (Soon to be remedied and given the whole OT treatment as Gizmo Pro).

dezcom's picture

Nick: I am sure you made the proper business decision, I know the feeling well.

PabloImpallari's picture

Great work Nick!

Stephen Rapp's picture

This is great, Nick. It really captures an authentic feel to handlettering which is not easily achieved with a font.

I personally did not have a problem with the previous "n" and "u". They each had the correct arch, it was simply a bit more subtle. Given context combined with even subtle clues I think the average reader would not have trouble with legibility.

Nick Cooke's picture

My thoughts exactly Stephen, (and thanks), but you know, some people are just so damn picky about the smallest details...

PabloImpallari's picture

Nick: How do you create the "rought" effect?

Nick Cooke's picture

Sure Pablo, I'll reveal my secrets to you. Writing at normal hand witing size with a Ball Pentel Fine Point R50, scanning at 300%, 300dpi. Place in Illustrator then LiveTrace on the 'Lettering' setting. I then scaled to about 1300%, copied, then pasted into the glyph window in FontLab then optimized, (clean up paths really).

So, it's not an 'effect' in reality - that's just how it is.

twiggy's picture

This is brilliant, the underline and strikethrough really top it off :)

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