It's about the price of fonts...

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Kevin Theophile's picture
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Joined: 6 Apr 2010 - 12:37pm
It's about the price of fonts...
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Hello everybody!

I have a quetsion about the price of fonts. I don't know exactly by how much price I sell one font with more of 100 glyphs to MyFonts...

If I sell a font with more of 100 glyphs to MyFonts, what is the price?
If I sell a font with more of 1000 glyphs to MyFonts, what is the price?
If I sell five fonts with more of 100 or 1000 glyphs to MyFonts, what are prices?

So I and my colleague intend to sell our own fonts to MyFonts, but we don't know exactly what the prices.

I saw the fonts family PF Beau Sans Pro, MyFonts sells one font by 79 dollars while it sells a fonts family by 729 dollars. I imagine the Parachute foundry sold to it by very high price.

Kevin

Nick Shinn's picture
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Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
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Study fonts on the sales charts at MyFonts and base you pricing policy on:

1. Whether a typeface is an attractive design.
2. How many OpenType features it has.
3. How many languages it supports.
4. How ornate it is.
5. What its price is.
6. What the EULA permits (e.g. number of terminals).

Andreas Stötzner's picture
Joined: 12 Mar 2007 - 10:21am
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The pricing will most instances be dictated by the market. And not by the number of glyphs.

When an average text font (single) containing 490 glyphs (e.g. Latin and Greek, good coverage) would cost $49, that makes ¢10 per glyph.
If I adopt this formula to the Andron family (which has more than 13.000 glyphs) I end up at a single licence price of $1.300 – which no one would ever pay.

There seems no other way than to look at the prices competitive fonts are offered at. And to make a competitive pricing in that range.

Nick Curtis's picture
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Joined: 21 Apr 2005 - 8:16am
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Price should also be based on utility; that is, how useful the font is to a wide range of uses. Most of my fonts are designed for headline use, and most have a specific "attitude," both of which limit their applications. Consequently, I don't ask a lot for them. The low price doesn't mean an inferior product: all the glyphs are hand-drawn (no autotracing, ever), hand-tweaked and hand-kerned for ALL possible letter combinations. Generally, what I lose in margin I gain in volume...

Paulo W's picture
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Joined: 22 May 2006 - 6:53am
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ALL comments here are right. The basis of the prices is a equation between many informations. But, the mostly important stills the market feeling and, in my point of view I think the "fame" of the foundry or type designer is a important factor, too. If the "Palimpsest" project, by Freiberger, was made by a famous designer, sure which the font will be a higher price.

So, the "Nick" table can be this way

1. Whether a typeface is an attractive design.
2. How many OpenType features it has.
3. How many languages it supports.
4. How ornate it is.
5. What its price is.
6. What the EULA permits (e.g. number of terminals).
7. Is the typeface own by a famous foundry?
8. Similar fonts medium prices

Paulo W's picture
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Joined: 22 May 2006 - 6:53am
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Andreas, how many fonts are in the Andrn family?

Blank's picture
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Joined: 25 Sep 2006 - 2:15pm
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Price can also be a marketing and branding tool. Some designs deliberately price high, offer very limited discounts, and only sell directly. This fosters an exclusive boutique brand that attracts fewer buyers, but more of them are high-end corporate buyers who outfit a lot of computers at once. On the other end, some people sell cheap and use free fonts and discounts to promote their work, which attracts lots of non-business users, students, and small businesses.

Nick Curtis's picture
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Joined: 21 Apr 2005 - 8:16am
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some people sell cheap and use free fonts and discounts to promote their work, which attracts lots of non-business users, students, and small businesses

True, but sometimes large enterprises--like Walt Disney Films, Turner Broadcasting, HarperCollins and Burger King--like the small guys' stuff, too...

Kevin Theophile's picture
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Joined: 6 Apr 2010 - 12:37pm
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Thank you for all your informations. I'll speak that all to my colleague.