Critiques | Pnina Extra Light

Typograph's picture

I have some dificulties deciding how to solvr the SHIN on this weight.

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david h's picture

> I have some dificulties deciding...

why and where do you see the problem with the shin?

gohebrew's picture

Wow, a radical shin, by golly!

Where is there another type design with such a shin, with its vertical really perfectly vertical, even touching its lower horizontal bottom?

I have never seen that.

I would reserve such a radical design for a modern looking letter set. To me, it looks awkward in a traditional-like setting.

Typograph's picture

Gohebrew:
as i said "I have some dificulties deciding how to solvr the SHIN on this weight"

> Where is there another type design with such a shin, with its vertical really perfectly vertical, even touching its lower horizontal bottom?

Look at Fontbit's Tehila Regular

>I would reserve such a radical design for a modern looking letter set. To me, it looks awkward in a traditional-like setting.

My issues are about balance and how it flows with the rest of the letters.
awkward or radical are not the issues concerning me

gohebrew's picture

Eli,

I reviewed Nadav Ezra's Tehila from FontBit. A traditional font with an unusual shin.

After carefully looking at your Pnina El, your design is very provocative, as it conjures up a whole slew of styles.

I particularly liked the serif spitz on the lower left of the shin. It subtly moves the eye forward leftward after the straight vertical middle bar of the shin. In addition, it creates more weight to the lower left side of shin, to better match the weight of the other letters. Plus, it's a stylistic uniqueness that makes this a special font.

Clearly, you are a very talented designer.

Scott-Martin Kosofsky's picture

Eli,

This is very nicely made. I never thought I'd see a Hebrew based on Lombardic letters, but I have now! This will make a very good type for children's books, I would think. As the father of two daughters, age 26 and 5, I have seen my share of children's books for girls, and I have a feeling this will be a success in that realm, perhaps for products, as well.

If you follow the Lombardic manner, you might try adding that serifed foot on both sides. Here's an American example of well-carved Lombardic letters, from the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, in Harlem, New York City.

William Berkson's picture

I suspect that the bottom half of the shin is too wide. Probably in a heavy weight, the white spaces close up more on the bottom, and look more balanced. When you go to a lighter weight, sometimes you have to change shape to keep the rhythm of counters the same.

In latin type we have that kind of problem working with weights with the aeg, where there are three strokes to work with in a small space; that's similar to the shin problem.

raphaelfreeman's picture

how about taking the middle leg and making it more like the zayin.

gohebrew's picture

I think Rephael is making a good suggestion, because then there is better placement for a dotted shin.

William Berkson's picture

I agree, the unstressed middle stroke does seem out of place—also on the ayin.

gohebrew's picture

The middle vertical stroke of the shin, and as Bill points out the left vertical stroke of the ayin are very straight and mainly of a single width.

They stand out because of this, and therefore seem odd.

Also, as a result, their is less rhyme and rhythm to text set in it. The music of text is its movement seen in its letters' shapes.

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