Is this a custom font?

(*resubmitting previously unanswered question)

Is this a proprietary font? If not, could anyone venture a guess as to what it is?

Many thanks!

Comments

From where is the sample?
Using http://www.whatfontis.com/ you can find a number of typefaces with varying degrees of similarity.
By the way, it’s better to bump/update your old thread instead of posting a new one: http://typophile.com/node/78308

The sample is from the Gramophone website: it's their magazine logo or masthead.

I'm keen on finding out the exact font rather than a similar font.

I already know that it's kind of similar to: OCR-B, Din, and Conduit.

And one person on this forum suggested I look at the PTF-Notes family from Primetype: Notes-Bold. This font indeed looks similar but it's not the exact one.

If anyone knows, I'd be most grateful for a followup.

Many thanks in advance!

Bumping this thread for another attempt at nailing this font...

Since my last post, I went on several font sites, including whatfontis... and narrowed it down to the following 3:

UBIK http://www.fontshop.com/search/?q=ubik
PTL NOTES http://www.fontshop.com/search/?q=ptl+notes&num=50
INFORMATIC http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/fatchair/informatic/

but I fear that none of these is a 100% match. To me it looks like a combination of all 3, which is of course unlikely. There's also the possibility that I've missed a style (such as Condensed etc).

Input from anyone with sharper eyes much appreciated.

Bump

For my money, none of them are "close". A quick look shows:

UBIK: G and M are way off

PTL NOTES: A and M are way off

INFORMATIC: G is way off

Why don't you ask Gramaphone Records?
http://webstore.gramaphonerecords.com/contact-us.aspx

I did. They never replied.

Anyone?

You should consider the possibility that the wordmark was modified on the basis of an existing typeface (maybe to emulate the look of an older, pre-digital logo). Given that, I think you were on the right track with PTL Notes. When you start with the small caps (!) of the medium cut and scale the letters non-proportionally (mainly condensing them), you will see that you can make ‘G’, ‘M’, ‘O’, ‘H’, ‘N’ and ‘E’ match the sample perfectly. In ‘R’, they made the diagonal steeper; in ‘A’, they raised the crossbar; in ‘P’, they made the bowl smaller—not necessarily wise decisions, by the way. That’s as close as you’re going to get, I think.

Hi R.

That's very insightful. Thanks so much for your detailed observations.
Incredibly helpful.