Critique required for beginner's sans

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Darren Reynolds's picture
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Joined: 26 Apr 2011 - 9:16am
Critique required for beginner's sans
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This is my first attempt at designing a (very rudimentary) typeface.

I've used a simple system where each letter is based on the letter "o" – although I'm aware that such a rigid approach is problematic to say the least. (I've tweaked only a few letters so far.)

All feedback on further alterations I need to consider, etc, would be much appreciated, thanks.

Riccardo Sartori's picture
Joined: 13 Jul 2009 - 4:20am
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This is a classic approach. See, as reference:
http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/cheapprofonts/geometry-soft-pro/
http://www.bowfinprintworks.com/BauhausFaces1.html

What could be interesting in your take is the varying width of the stroke.

Darren Reynolds's picture
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Joined: 26 Apr 2011 - 9:16am
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riccard0, thanks for your reply.

As you say I think that the varying width is the potentially interesting aspect here.

Any comments on specific alterations to individual glyphs / the overall typeface would be appreciated.

Riccardo Sartori's picture
Joined: 13 Jul 2009 - 4:20am
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It all depends on how much you want to stick to the purely geometric construction. Otherwise, optically, s is too narrow/unbalanced, u and k are too wide, etc.

Darren Reynolds's picture
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Joined: 26 Apr 2011 - 9:16am
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Thanks again for the feedback: this is exactly the sort of help I was hoping for. I don't really understand how one makes decisions about glyph width, etc, etc. Are there specific rules? Is it done purely by eye?

I'd be happy to sacrifice the rigidity of the geometric system in an attempt to create a much more subtle typeface, although I don't want to lose the overall geometric feel. I will try making some alterations and upload the results soon.

Riccardo Sartori's picture
Joined: 13 Jul 2009 - 4:20am
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Gary Lonergan's picture
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Joined: 2 Jan 2007 - 3:04pm
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Varying the widths will give you much more flexibility. The lowercase k in particular would benefit from being more narrow