Wordmark for Active Apparel Startup

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Michael O'Laughlin's picture
Joined: 8 May 2003 - 7:41pm
Wordmark for Active Apparel Startup
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This is the first logo I've drawn entirely from the ground up and am looking for some general feedback on the typography and design. It's for a company that will be selling clothing designed for outdoor enthusiasts and travelers. One of the requirements of the project is that it work well on a waistband. I took this to mean that it should be wide, rectangular, and not suffer too much from being stretched horizontally. Note that the coloration shown is simply to give it a bit of twinkle for presentation; I'm still experimenting with color schemes and mulling over any 3D treatments it might receive online. Applied to products, though, the color will likely be flat and solid, which means I need to produce a wordmark that can stand on its own, without much window dressing.

I welcome any comments you may have. Thank you!

johnnydib's picture
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Joined: 13 Oct 2008 - 11:39pm
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I really it. The X is balanced which I know can be a little tricky.
If I have to say something: I'd be tempted to see how the T would look if the "serifs" on the bar were assymetrical, what I have in mind is the left serif being wider, I wonder if something like that will make the logo a little more animate.
Also you see how your R if you remove the leg it's basically a P, meaning the corner of the outside curve where it meets the Leg is lined with the bottom horizontal. Well try bringing that corner up, this will reduce the amount of ink in that area.
But honestly it looks good like this so...

johnnydib's picture
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Joined: 13 Oct 2008 - 11:39pm
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I really it. The X is balanced which I know can be a little tricky.
If I have to say something: I'd be tempted to see how the T would look if the "serifs" on the bar were assymetrical, what I have in mind is the left serif being wider, I wonder if something like that will make the logo a little more animate.
Also you see how your R if you remove the leg it's basically a P, meaning the corner of the outside curve where it meets the Leg is lined with the bottom horizontal. Well try bringing that corner up, this will reduce the amount of ink in that area.
But honestly it looks good like this so...

Michael O'Laughlin's picture
Joined: 8 May 2003 - 7:41pm
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Good call on the R! That's a great refinement (for what is probably a common blunder). I also increased the thickness of the bottom of the E, ever so slightly to give it a more solid feeling base.

I'm not sure about the asymmetrical T, though. I gave it a shot, but I don't know that it adds that much. Performing that little experiment did, however, lead me to realize that my original T was too narrow. I definitely prefer it wider.

James Michaels's picture
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Joined: 6 Mar 2010 - 12:54am
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> One of the requirements of the project
> is that it work well on a waistband.
> I took this to mean that...

Your guess about what they meant sounds reasonable, but just the same it might be wise to ask them to explain further exactly what they meant.

Many times I've tried to guess what a client meant by a vague comment, only to find out later that they meant something else. Sometimes this is because a client is so familiar with their company's product that they tend to talk in verbal shorthand and just assume everyone knows what they're talking about.

Michael O'Laughlin's picture
Joined: 8 May 2003 - 7:41pm
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I guess I could have phrased that better. It was agreed upon that the logo should be wide, rectangular and stretchable, but you have a good point. Non-graphics folks definitely struggle with articulating their ideas. Heck, graphics professionals struggle with it, too.

Luma Vine's picture
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Joined: 1 Jun 2010 - 1:16pm
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Have you tried the X with one heavy and one light stroke? That seems like it would continue the contrast you have in the other letters.

Robert Koritnik's picture
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Joined: 30 May 2007 - 5:52pm
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/X/ looks lighter than others anyways... And also doesn't share the same stylistic add-ons as other letters do with those serif like terminals.

I also agree with Luma Vine that /X/ should have similar stroke contrast as other letters do...

But on the other hand I must say that I like letter /X/ the most because it seems the most original with wedge strokes. Maybe try a wedge stroke variation on other letters as well? It could turn out to be very nice and special.

Michael O'Laughlin's picture
Joined: 8 May 2003 - 7:41pm
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Okay, so I've attempted to implement a few more suggestions here to see how they work.

First off, I increased the contrast of the X in an attempt to keep the same overall design, but make in feel like it has similar thick/thin proportions to the rest of the font, without actually making one stroke lighter. It seems like it might be a tad to heavy now, but correct me if I'm wrong.

Next, I tried incorporating the "wedge" idea further, but without radically changing the design. The R seems like a logical place.

Just for kicks, I tried a design direction (that I had previously abandoned) and made the whole thing more "wedgy." Granted, it's a far cry from a balanced bit of type, but I can already see that it's threatening to be a kitschy sci-fi font. I think there's a reason I didn't go down this road the first time I thought of it.

Finally, I gave a true thick/thin X a try. I turned out better than I anticipated, but I'm still very taken with the other one.

Any thoughts?