Ouch...

mrjono's picture

I'm seeing more and more of this. Don't they have optical kerning on final cut?

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PublishingMojo's picture

Film title designers often don't bother with true apostrophes, either. Nothing spoils a movie for me like seeing a four-foot-tall prime symbol up there on the screen.

riccard0's picture

I cornw, you cornw, we all cornw! ;-)

dtw's picture

Victor: thank god it’s not just me then...

Nick Shinn's picture

I for one am glad that Optical Kerning is not on by default in whatever program created this title.
So that’s why plain old Georgia (no kerning) looks like this.
Interestingly, the Segoe Script setting uses contextual alternates, presumably on by default.

One should be more concerned that the designer chose such mundane bundled fonts, which expresses a certain disdain for the subject matter, even if such dependence on bundled fonts were occasioned by ignorance of more sophisticated alternatives.

Té Rowan's picture

That title is definitely Kern-OW!

Si_Daniels's picture

>Interestingly, the Segoe Script setting uses contextual alternates, presumably on by default.

Actually I don't think the alternates are being applied. Long tail on the "e" and "n" shouldn't happen if the features are applied.

Si

mrjono's picture

Great spot Té Rowan!

I didn't mention in my original post that the Cornish word for Cornwall is Kernow. Being a proud Cornishman myself I chuckled to myself about that but didn't mention it here, thought it might be a bit esoteric for general discussion but I regret it now!

How appropriate though. Kern-now!

aluminum's picture

One that made me cringe recently:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USxhXb5VC5E

Well, I mean, the entire preview makes me cringe, but especially the title. What is "a ges"?

Don McCahill's picture

While the examples are bad, especially the first one, you have to realize that most people do not see things the way typographers do. Because we are tasked with eliminating bad kerning, our eyes immediately spot the problem. To others, there is no problem (unless they are the minority that read a space instead of the bad kern).

It would be interesting to find out how many non-typographer/designers can spot the problem with these samples. I suspect most of them will look for spelling and/or grammar errors, and totally ignore the typography. Ask your partner (if they are not in the field), and see if my theory holds water.

Té Rowan's picture

@mrjono – There are some temptations I just can’t resist.

@Don – Looking for sprlling/grammar errors is something we learn in school. Not so with typographical errors.

Nick Shinn's picture

To others, there is no problem…

Sure, if you ask them, most listeners might not be able to detect a wrong note, but that’s not the issue.

If designers addressed every aspect of their work on a similar basis, then there really would be a problem. So it’s better to never let your guard down.

As for spelling, people will read what they expect, but that’s no excuse for incorrect spelling, even though it may go unnoticed.

Justin_Ch's picture

But I doubt these are mistakes made by designers. Because the titling is part of the editing software package, they are being done by video editors, hence the typopgraphic errors and unimaginative use of free system fonts.

aluminum's picture

"While the examples are bad, especially the first one, you have to realize that most people do not see things the way typographers do. Because we are tasked with eliminating bad kerning, our eyes immediately spot the problem."

I think we all understand that. The concern is that PEOPLE SETTING THE TYPE should see this. ;)

Justin_Ch...if the video editor is setting type, then they very much are the graphic designers. Just really crappy ones.

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