Dezcom is proud to announce the release of "Dez Yinznat Stencil," a tough typeface with an industrial quality.

dezcom's picture

January 17, 2012.

Dezcom Typefaces is proud to announce the release of "Dez Yinznat Stencil," a tough typeface with an industrial quality.

"Dez Yinznat" is a condensed stencil Opentype-savvy sans serif inspired by the industrial city of Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Stencil type was often used in the steel mills, scrap metal yards, railroads, warehouses, and other industrial institutions of Pittsburgh and is almost a signature for the City.

The name comes from combining two colloquial expressions common to Pittsburgh. "Yinz" is used there like "You'all" is used in Southern States. "n'at" or sometimes "N@" is used to replace "and that" when ending a phrase.

The designer, Chris Lozos, says, "Pittsburgh was a true melting pot in my youth. My grandfather grew up in Greece and worked in the steel mills in Pittsburgh along side every other ethnicity. There "broken English" was the norm. Accents mingled and got mangled. Somehow, out of it all, came this odd dialect. Pittsburghese is not a very pleasant sounding departure from the norm but it befits hard times, hard work, tough conditions and a brotherhood of nationalities all bound together with the hope that the quitting time whistle would blow soon and they could rest—at least until their next shift."

This font is dedicated to the hard-working people who made steel then and now. From Homestead Works, Pittsburgh and other American mill towns from Gary south to Birmingham and across the Atlantic to Europe's Hamburg, Sheffield, Pražská, Košice, Liége, Smederevo, and more.

is now available through MyFonts at:
http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/dezcom/dez-yinznat-stencil/

Copyright 2012 by Chris Lozos and Dezcom

steve.mackley's picture

As an yinzer ex-pat living in the Midwest, this made me chuckle like you wouldn't believe. Nice work!

dezcom's picture

Thanks N@ ;-)

William Berkson's picture

Congrats Chris! This is a stencil with a lot more subtlety and warmth in the curves than usual. Is that what you were going for?

dezcom's picture

Thanks, Bill, Yes,I was trying to move away from the way stencils are really made--to suit the cutting equipment, and make it abit more personal.

sim's picture

Great works Chris! Do you plan a light version? it would be nice I think.

\·> André

Nick Shinn's picture

An interesting disposition of cuts — postmodern, I would say.

dezcom's picture

André, Thanks! I had not planned on a light but if I get enough requests,I might.

Nick, I don't know postmodern from Post-Toasties, I just put the cuts where I thought they should be ;-)

Nick Shinn's picture

Dude, you so grok the now.

Té Rowan's picture

That’s a right odd yin. Industrial yet warm. And I’m not thinking of the steel kettles.

rs_donsata's picture

Nice! It feels quite contemporary.

Arthus's picture

I really like the cut of the lower case n and m, it all really works well together.

I do must say though, that some of the punctuation misses the charm of the rest of the character set (I like the ampersand, but the @ and # have some quite clinical cuts.)

All in all a nice approach to industrial stencil type.

dezcom's picture

Thanks, Arthus, and señor Donsata!

@té, There are plenty of banged up looking stencils out there to be had. I was looking for a face that had broader usage than just that. I was trying for use in high-tech and clean, modern subjects as well. The basic steel industry has faded a great deal but cities have replaced their molten pours with extruded and technological production of materials, n@.

dezcom's picture

Special thanks to Typedia for today's Yinz'nat mention at: http://typedia.com/blog/post/type-news-soup-for-you/

Scroll down a bit to see the image and kind words.

Stephen Rapp's picture

Nice job! Should be a winner.

dezcom's picture

Thanks, Stephen!

Té Rowan's picture

Reckon there'll be a spate of stencil-cut inserats following this.

Nick Shinn's picture

Chris, you forgot the stencil on several letters, such as “i”, “l” and “t”.

riccard0's picture

I clearly see it on i. It’s horizontal.

Té Rowan's picture

Mhm. And putting stencil on 'l' and 't' would make it less authentic and more gimmicky.

dezcom's picture

Nick, The cuts in stencils are used where needed to account for trapped areas and problematic angles that could lift and tear in application. Where letters do not have these issues, cuts that just occur for style are counterproductive (excuse the pun). Having tried cuts on some of the glyphs you mentioned,it became clear that readability was reduced far too much just for a certain style or "Look".

I chose to stay closer to what worked best as an entire alphabet rather than what some might prefer stylistically. Being too concerned about style makes me very nervous. When the "Look" trumps the "Need", style is always the loser in my eyes.

dezcom's picture

Finally cracked the top 50 "Hot New Fonts" list on MyFonts! :-)

sim's picture

Great to you Chris!

dezcom's picture

Finally made the "Featured" spot on MyFonts home page.

Té Rowan's picture

How easily can you folk, yinzer or not, read the Scouse Rubaiyat (near the bottom of the page)?

Nick Shinn's picture

It’s useless if you don't already know the pronunciation.
For instance, is “winder” with a short or long “i”?
So all it’s good for is the vocabulary, e.g. that “dog-eared moggies” means battle-scarred cats.
But that’s the point of its humour.

dezcom's picture

The simple joys of humor ;-)

Té Rowan's picture

@Nick – Check the middle of the page for some Scouse→English translations.

dezcom's picture

Dez Yinznat named "Typeface of the Week" at TYPO:

http://www.typo.cz/pismo-tydne/

marcox's picture

Praise from a master! Congrats, Chris.

dezcom's picture

Thanks, Marc!

dezcom's picture

Arthur,
You are right about the @ sign. I added a new one. The old one becomes an alternate.

Queneau's picture

Woohoo! I just licensed it! Great work Chris, thanks a lot and good luck with it!

By the way: any idea when the other typefaces announcedon your site will become available? Like Now Sans and Tavarich, which sem real good.

Té Rowan's picture

Passed the town museum a short while ago and happened to have the brownie in the pocket, so I snapped some pix of real-life stencils.


dezcom's picture

Thanks, Té!
I love the Cyrillic one in metal!

Té Rowan's picture

These two were used to label herring barrels. I think, in fact, that all of the stencils in the window were barrel stencils. Mind, I snapped eight pix of varying quality.

The Cyrillic one... Iceland sold salted herring to the Soviet Union. As I understand it, it was/is a very popular meal with the vodka. Herring salads taste good, that's for sure.

dezcom's picture

Was it made of bronze?

Té Rowan's picture

No idea, though I think it's brass.

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