Technical Problems for using OTF fonts with Older Versions of Photoshop and other Adobe Products.

ashosaki's picture

Hello all dear and great typographers.

I have designed some new Latin typefaces and converted them into OTF format using FontLab and installed them in the \Windows\Fonts folder as usual. I am using a Windows XP SP3 and Adobe Photoshop CS and CS2 products. When I tried to use and select my fonts to be used with Photoshop CS/CS2, I had many error messages informing me that there are errors in the program, the RAM is not enough, the text engine cannot be initialized, and other weird messages. (I will attach some photos of the Photoshop messages).

I noticed also that the icon located beside me new OTF fonts in the list of fonts shown by Photoshop CS2 is for TTF fonts not for OTF fonts that I have designed and copied to the Fonts folder.

The original designed typefaces are in TTF and I used the FontLab to convert them into OTF format. I do not have this problem at all when I copy the original TTF fonts to the Fonts folder. Also, When I use Photoshop CS4, I also do not have this problem at all.

What could be the possible reasons for such errors in Photoshop CS and CS2? How could I convert my TTF to OTF using FontLab software without having such errors in the Photoshop CS and CS2?

I hope that you can tell me more about the solutions for these painful problems.

Thank you for your time.

Ash O.
Osaka ..

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ralf h.'s picture

Why do you want to convert TTF to OTF in the first place? If you don’t add OpenType features, there is no reason to convert to an OpenType format. And even if you add OpenType features, there is no need to switch from TrueType outlines to PostScript outlines. (Which is suggested by using the .otf suffix).

See also: http://opentype.info/blog/2010/07/31/opentype-myths-explained/

ashosaki's picture

Dear Ralf H.

I do thank you for your contribution regarding the myths about Opentype Fonts. The same problem is also encountered with Truetype fonts when using Adobe Photoshop. It is not a problem of the font type.

I have found through reading in the Internet some facts about opentype fonts. I have read that "Opentype should be far better at handling fonts that contain variant glyphs of the same characters, particularly Hindu fonts where individual letters often combine into complex ligatures. Various high-end features in these fonts currently only work in high-end desktop publishing software."

You can find more about the benefits of Opentype/CFF over Truetype:
http://blogs.adobe.com/typblography/2010/12/the-benefits-of-opentypecff-...

Té Rowan's picture

@ashosaki – Truetype is already a subset of OpenType, namely TT-flavoured OpenType. The other subset is PS-flavoured or CFF-flavoured OpenType.

Just slap on the OT features you want plus a dummy DSIG (Digital SIGnature) for the WinXP users, and you're sitting on the top of the world.

Theunis de Jong's picture

Té, somehow I'm not convinced that will make any font suddenly brimming with "variant glyphs of the same characters, particularly Hindu fonts where individual letters often combine into complex ligatures".

You can add one more myth to the list: converting an existing Font into Opentype will not magically add all of those yummy features.

Té Rowan's picture

Mebbe not, but it does mean that changing outlines from TT to PS is not necessary.

Theunis de Jong's picture

No, it's the OP who understood just about every important detail the wrong way around.

It's not the font format per se that makes these special options available, what counts is which features are defined in the font to begin with.

(But leaving his mistaken expectations for what they are: the one thing that's missing from this discussion so far is an explanation for why his attempt to simply convert from one type to another failed.
It might be as simple as that he left the original fonts installed as well -- invalidating all font caches etc.)

ralf h.'s picture

… and just opening a TTF and directly generating a (CFF-flavoured) OTF from that is not really a proper conversion. I would expect a lot of problems with such a font.

ashosaki's picture

All comments are good regarding the TTF and OTF. Unfortunately, no one of you told me about the problem that I encounter with Adobe Photoshop and other Adobe programs.

The most important question, why do I have troubles when I use my fonts with Adobe Photoshop and other related software? You can get more about these problem through the attached photos.

Thank you for your expected technical help.

Ash ...

ralf h.'s picture

The most important question, why do I have troubles when I use my fonts with Adobe Photoshop and other related software?

This was my answer:
… and just opening a TTF and directly generating a (CFF-flavoured) OTF from that is not really a proper conversion. I would expect a lot of problems with such a font.

From what I read, you just open a TrueType-based font and directly generate a PostScript-based OTF font from that. Those are different formats and you need to take care of converting TT to PS outlines, correct path directions, convert the hinting and so on. And as we have said before: there is not even a reason to do all this.

Té Rowan's picture

Windows XP will only accept a TT-flavoured OpenType font as OpenType if it has a digital signature (DSIG).

If these Adobe products won't accept TrueType or TT-flavoured OpenType fonts, they are FUBAR. Period.

In short, do not convert between TT and CFF unless you must. There are just too many pits, traps and grues in the way.

gargoyle's picture

Do the errors still appear in Photoshop CS and CS2 after uninstalling your converted fonts? If not, that would suggest an issue with the fonts which would be difficult (and in this case rather pointless) to diagnose. If the errors do persist, you can try clearing the font caches by searching your system for “adobefnt*.lst” and deleting those files.

Miguel Sousa's picture

why do I have troubles when I use my fonts with Adobe Photoshop and other related software?

Perhaps because the fonts you made are technically defected? Run them through MS Font Validator.

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