Sort of obscure typefaces that are inordinately popular in one country

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Johan Palme's picture
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Joined: 23 Jan 2011 - 6:07am
Sort of obscure typefaces that are inordinately popular in one country
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I'm wondering if there are any typefaces that you've seen a lot of in your country/city/region, but that barely seem to be known elsewhere?

For instance (maybe because I'm keeping an eye out for it) here in Sweden, [[http://www.bertholdtypes.com/font/boton/pro/|Boton]] seems to be in just about every other ad these days, yet I've never seen it anywhere else.

Hrant H Papazian's picture
Joined: 3 May 2000 - 11:00am
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In Denmark, any font with the "totally open" binocular "g".
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/danishg/

In Armenia, Sylfaen (for obvious reasons).

hhp

Maxim Zhukov's picture
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Joined: 8 May 2005 - 11:18am
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In USSR that was Literaturnaya (née Lateinisch; H.Berthold, 1901). It was ubiquitous. This is what Allan Hutt, a great typographic expert and a devout communist, wrote about it, in total frustration:

The survival of this De Vinne-style type, from the worst design period of old Imperial Germany, in the premier Socialist country in the latter part of the twentieth century, is a typographical phenomenon as unique as it is deplorable.
Allen Hutt. “A revolution in Russian typography”. Penrose Annual, Volume 61. New York: Hastings House, 1968
Nick Shinn's picture
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Joined: 8 Jul 2003 - 11:00am
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I don’t think its pedigree is quite as bad as Hutt suggests.
It’s an Elzevir: upscale, French.
BBS and Linotype had Elzevirs in the early twentieth century, neither deplorable.
But no, never a popular style, and completely out of favor in the West during most of the Soviet era.

**

In Canada, Rod MacDonald’s revival of Cartier, the first Canadian type design (1967), is often used for Canadiana.

Nick Curtis's picture
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Joined: 21 Apr 2005 - 8:16am
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For awhile—the 1950s through the 1980s—Craw Clarendon (or a reasonable facsimile thereof) was reasonably ubiquitous in its association with the U.S. Government.