Ceggo

dglen's picture

Ceggo is an exercise in spacing and horizontal letter size. It's the horizontal width relations between the characters that was my focus.
Only have uc and lc right now. I'm creating the font in Glyphs (it's a really great app, very smooth).
Let me know what you think.
I was shooting for a Bold or Demi Condensed. I've called it bold for now.

Regards,

dglen

UC:
http://cl.ly/3d273X132J2u1N0m3H1t

lc:
http://cl.ly/0M452e351L3K0Q1p1n0V

hrant's picture

I don't know why the "S" thinks the "R" smells bad :-) because it's my favorite glyph - in fact I think you could [re]think everything around that "R". And the "a" might do the same for the lc.

I don't get why the "h" and "g" are short (although the other descenders might in fact be too long).

BTW, could you explain your "horizontal width relations" angle?

hhp

dglen's picture

hrant

You have a good eye. The h was an oversite. You look at these things for so long that after awhile that you literally don't see some obvious errors.

The "S" is somewhat in the same boat. I'll have to check but it might be a different version than I had in mind.
So skip the "S", skip the "h". The font is like and old typewriter with two broken keys.

Regarding the horizontal width of the characters. I'm using a book called "Designing Type" by Karen Cheng as a sort of textbook. She really goes into detail as to the size of characters. I've learned a lot.

If it doesn't make sense it's not worth belaboring. It does make sense to me but I may not be able to properly articulate the idea.

Thanks for the feedback.

dglen

hrant's picture

I like the Cheng book - it's useful. The thing is, it's sort of a second volume in a series... and volume one -where one learns the basics of type design- has yet to be written. :-/

hhp

dglen's picture

Do you have a couple other books that you think are useful? I'm really interested in the mechanical aspects of creating fonts. There are quite a few books on general type design (at least I'm pretty sure there are).

What I need is a book or two similar to Cheng's. One where specific relations between letters are spelled out. I know such things vary per font but Cheng did a pretty good job of distilling each letter in relation to their case and other characters.

I don't need how to's on software, that's easy, just suggestions, if you have any, on books like Chengs.

dglen

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