Greek (nationality) type designer / typeface wanted!

TEAiM's picture

I design a magazine, each issue is about a specific city. The next issue will be about Athens, Greece. I am trying to get in touch with any type designers who live and/or work in Greece, preferably Athens. Do you know of anyone?

The past 2 issues of the magazine have used typefaces created by high profile type designers in appropriate cities and I wish to continue this precedent by representing the city through the typography.

Any help or opinions on Greek type please get in touch! thanks. Feel free to email me here: hello@luketonge.com

hrant's picture

Although a font made by a Greek person is certainly more likely to exhibit Greek characteristics, the important thing (I assume) is finding the right Greek-looking font no matter who made it. The reader will get more out of the font itself (which he cannot escape) than simply knowing that the designer is Greek (which he might never even find out anyway).

If you can get in touch with Michail Semoglou* he might be able to furnish you with a nice Hellenized Latin font he showed me a few years ago.

* http://www.cannotnot.net

Please read:
http://typophile.com/node/2293#comment-18338

hhp

Nick Shinn's picture

…the important thing (I assume) is finding the right Greek-looking font no matter who made it.

Ordinarily, but that doesn’t appear to be the premise of this magazine.

TEAiM's picture

Hey everyone! thanks so much for the quick responses! Some great leads to explore and follow up. @Nick Shinn you're spot on, for me it is more important to have an authentic greek-designed typeface to use as a headline font throughout the mag than it is to have a 'greek-looking' font.

Here's Alex Sheldon's 'Detroit' we used for our Detroit issue – http://typographica.org/typeface-reviews/detroit/
and for our latest issue, London, Seb Lester's 'Soho' – http://www.formfiftyfive.com/2012/05/boat-magazine-london/

Please do keep getting in touch or replying on here with helpful links – it's a massive help!

hrant's picture

The Detroit font nicely evokes Detroit. Soho sort of evokes London, but surely there are other fonts -probably including some by type designers from London- that evoke it better. I'm wondering what the rationale could be for focusing so much on the geography of the designer. Is there after all any person that's "pure" Athenian for example? What's the criterion for being "from Athens"?

More useful than a cute play on the idea of a font physically coming from a city would be a font that evokes that city no matter where it was made. For example if you find a font that somehow evokes Athens, but it was made in Thessaloniki, would you rather use a Parisian-looking font made by somebody was born in Thessaloniki but currently lives in Athens? If so, how do you justify that beyond your own whim? This path is clearly fraught with peril...

A suggestion that's only partly serious:
http://www.typography.com/fonts/font_styles.php?productLineID=100000&ite...

Related: http://ww.typophile.com/node/89329

hhp

riccard0's picture

Well, for a real retro feeling, there always is Athens! ;-)

TEAiM's picture

@hrant, this is all very subjective and i'm not sure that i've explained my position incredibly well... Yes, Detroit the typeface accurately evokes Detroit the city, as it was intended to do. Soho was not meant to represent London, but it does so very well and is hugely versatile for magazine headlines. As for other typefaces 'evoking London better' – perhaps – but I am trying to avoid trite and painfully obvious choices that remove any element of subjectivity or sensitivity from the work. Detroit you could argue does this, but its versatility and complexity elevate it above this.

The basic rationale is one of authenticity. Of wanting the magazine to truly be 'of the place' Each issue is dedicated to a city, and so when possible I like to match a great typeface or family by a local type designer, to represent that place. In answer to your question, No, I'm not so daft that i'd pass up a great typeface by someone from another Greek city, and go with something less-suited to the issue from a 'pure-athenian'. So yes, the primary task is to find a typeface that represented both the look and feel of the city – but to narrow the huge pool of options a good place to start is by looking at type designers from that city. They are also usually more interested in their type being used to represent 'their' city, and as such generally are happy to donate their typeface in exchange for the exposure the magazine gives them.

And yes, as the art-director of the magazine, my whim also plays a part.

The tricky part is finding a typeface that represents a city I've never visited. We spend time in the city making the magazine but time constraints sometimes dictate needing to get a head-start on the process, hence me doing some research and investigation in advance.

Anyway, enough waffle. A modern, Greek, authentic typeface is what I'm after :) thanks so much for taking the time to engage with me about this! I hope i've made sense.

hrant's picture

Well, there's clearly a lot more than "whim" going on - good to see.

I certainly think you can find a font made in Greece -and probably Athens- that will do all you need. If you ever feature a city with few type designers however you might have to improvise.

Anyway I for one would love to see your results, now and in the future.

hhp

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