Need for advice / suggestions about appearance and font pairing on a logo

charleda's picture

Hi all !
I would be very pleased to get some advice and suggestions about the font pairing and global appearance of this combination. At the moment, it is just a start on a business card. The company is specialized in high-end microelectronics and wants to contrast radically from the other companies in their sector... I made some boards with different variations and identity elements, but I need to know what you are thinkning about those two simple lines : logo and font pairing... Thank you by advance to all of you !

Nick Shinn's picture

Try a pseudo-monowidth font, for a slightly more sophisticated look while still maintaining the desired connotations—and a well-proportioned “@”.

charleda's picture

Thank you for your answer Nick ! Indeed, my @ is awful... When you write "pseudo-monowidth" font, you mean something like a Letter Gothic for instance ?

charleda's picture

I also tried with Archer Light, which gives something a bit more "sensitive"...

Nick Shinn's picture

Yes, New Letter Gothic.
Officina Sans is another.

charleda's picture

Thank you again !

charleda's picture

I just tried with Officina Sans, and I must say it is just what I looked for ! And the @ is really "sweet".

aluminum's picture

The line weight thicknesses are a bit imbalanced, IMHO (really thick circle, thick W, thin remaining letters)

charleda's picture

Yes, you have to be right aluminum, I was wondering if it was perceived as "too much" or just enough to accentuate the "We"...

charleda's picture

By the way, I am really sorry for my bad english. Aaaaargh.

Luma Vine's picture

Is the (k) part of the logo? I can't imagine that reproducing well at even business card size, let alone web or other applications.

charleda's picture

@Luma Vine : my fault, I let the (k) but it is not at this size on the business card !

Frode Bo Helland's picture

What is the intention with the logo? I see a lot of issues, but intentional "errors" have had an upturn lately (although faux naïve is probably dead by Christmas). As already mentioned, the weight is problematic, but I also think the balance (both overall, and inter-letter) and lack of optical adjustments is.

What is it supposed to be, btw?

charleda's picture

You are right, there are visual mistakes. The "roc" is the suffix for a whole line of products, and "wee" suggests three specific know-how of the company. The whole name means also what it tells phonetically... The circle simply recalls the "bridge" between two meanings : "we rock" and the technical meaning very near from the wafers used in electronics. I am looking for a way to make "we" clearly appear and at the same time, suggest that "roc" is like a mark inside of the company. The (k) suggests the mathematics (power, equations, ... ) and also forms the "k" of "rock".
One of the difficulties I have is that the logo has to be ready to be printed in really exotic conditions ( nanometric print on circuits, print on materials used in satellites,.... ). I thought quite "naïvely" that visual mistakes would permit to perceive more easily the logo in very special conditions. The idea is also to evoke the "random conditions" of nano universe.

riccard0's picture

For the |W|, I think you should use the same stroke width as the other letters, and also try a shape without crossing arms.

charleda's picture

I agree with |W| stroke width ! The crossing arms break the "fluidity" ( flow ? ) of the logo but at the same time recalls one of the company missions : developping components which come at the crossing of many other components on a circuit... I would agree to say that this illustration has again something naïve but also has the advantage to be quickly understandable by the members of this particular profession. ( And, again, I am really sorry for this kind of english ).

Frode Bo Helland's picture

The monoline naïve look can definitely work, espc. in the context of a circuit board, but it seem to me the idea behind it is neither well considered nor well executed. Perhaps you need to return to the idea stage?

In a serious business segment like this I would advice against a high school pun like “we rock”. At least that’s the impression I’ve gotten from the customers I’ve had in the microelectronics field.

PS:
I see I’m the only one questioning the fundamentals here, so I’ll leave it to you to figure out who is worth listening to.

charleda's picture

I totally agree with you, I would like to return to the idea stage but I made the mistake to show some boards and this one got the definitive attention of my client. The "we rock" thing is unhappily already in their name, and they decided it intentionally... But I also think nothing has to be rigid at the moment, so I will follow your suggestion and try something else. By the way, they also liked very much other elements I showed us... So I have to take that in count. May I show you what comes after your suggestions ?

Luma Vine's picture

I think the circuit idea works, and I like the forms of the letters except the /W. What if you try the circuit board hole circle as a ball terminal, maybe on the /r and /c inspired by this form: http://www.paratype.com/pictures/help/term/30.gif

Perhaps a simple matching lower case /w would do the trick, and/or one looking more like /uu with 2 curved bottoms?

For a secondary font, try to pick something that is technical and a bit fun to reflect what seems to be the brand characteristics. Maybe look at the sommet family?

I think this is a solid idea, but generating some other ideas is often very helpful even if you decide to refine this direction.

p.s. I really would drop the (k) - I get 'we rock' just fine without it. One too many concepts sometimes dilutes the value of them all.

charleda's picture

Thank you Luma ! I am working on a "refining" of the image I dropped at the beginning of my post and another idea... I will update the post with new images. Thank you again to all of you !

charleda's picture

I forgot to mention that the circle ( all but subtle ) is used in many different contexts : pastilles ( chips ? ), labels on round elements and some other round elements often found on satellites. I insert here some examples

charleda's picture

I agree the (k) is inappropriate on the main logo but can be useful in other contexts. I would like to keep this option up and find a way to introduce it.

Luma Vine's picture

1) That circle looks lopsided - not perfectly circular.
2) My first association with that shape is a vynil record. WR = Weeroc Records?

HVB's picture

And here I thought that the (k) was one of the following, but I didn't want to display my ignorance by asking:
Kosher (the usual meaning)
An indication of Kopyright or trademarK or proteKtion in a language or culture I'm not familiar with.
The designer's initial (Kharleda?)

It NEVER occurred to me that it had anything whatsoever to do with the punned word itself. If that's what it is, it's absolutely useless and ridiculous unless it immediately follows the clear letters, as in ROC(k), and even there, it's totally unnecessary.

Herb

Té Rowan's picture

Wee roc = little big bird?

hrant's picture

"World Record"? Coz it looks like an old record... :-)

hhp

charleda's picture

Circle is indeed not perfectly circular, that is wanted. And the fact that it recalls old vinyls is also wanted. Those labels ( or chips ? ) will appear on electronic circuits in satellites or IRM scanners. The naïve idea behind this is to remind the name of the company ( weeroc ). The particular context, in my humble opinion, makes it even more ridiculous to insist on the high-end technology side. We choose to underline the human side. But circular shape stays in the global meaning field ( wafer, chip, circuit termination, etc...).

For the (k) thing, advice was what I expected -and found !- but I didn't really expect observations like :"unnecessary" or "ridiculous". Kosher symbol ? It never displays like this- examples here : https://www.google.fr/search?q=kosher+symbols&hl=fr&rlz=1C1MACD_enFR499F...

But I agree this (k) generates "parasite discussions". Goodbye (k), and I go back to work. Thank you for all these reactions.

Luma Vine's picture

What is missing from my understanding of your goals is:
1) Is standing out from the competition the same thing to you as being a bit silly/playful/cheeky in a high end market? How is a music reference more human than circuit board reference?
2) Who is the audience for this branding effort?
3) In what circumstances will this mark function as an identity (communicate something to your audience) rather than just an identifier (to signify who made that circuit board that nobody every sees inside a satellite for example)?

If you are going for a non circle, you need to go farther with the distortion to make it look like something other than a mistake.

charleda's picture

Luma, I will fright you again in saying that the questions you ask are the questions I asked to myself.

1) I understand very well that the frontier between "standing out from the competition" and "being a bit silly/playful/cheeky" is really thin. The first mistake I made was to post images, because what we have here are just directions, and I never considered them as being definitive displays. That said, on the music reference, I ask a new question : why the hell did the NASA sent a song from Mars to the Earth ? Many answers are available to answer the question, but among them, one seems very clear to me : music is "human only". But the circle is not just a record, it also recalls the Voyager Golden Record wiki|Voyager_Golden_Record

As a symbol, Voyager Program is the first program to illustrate the will of human beings to link with the Universe. This said, we go to your second question

2) The audience for the branding effort is people who do their job to touch a dream born with those space programs, and Voyager is their common legend. Happily, the circle symbol materializes the link between their "dream", their professional activity and their common specificity ( they are human beings ). During the briefing, the unperfect circle immediately made them react positively because it also illustrates to them the "quantic world", where human perception becomes like a trap.

Question 3 is "the question of the moment" : I have to have a big time working specifically on this.

And... I agree the circle has to be farther distorted !

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