Really heavy/black glyphs, high contrast, transitional serif types

etahchen's picture

Hi. I'm design some type with the following concept:
i want to get the glyphs as bold/heavy as possible, but also having high contrast between the thicks and thins. its kind of an experiment testing the relationship of the black and white. the serifs will be very thin, i want the glyphs to have a sexy fashionable look to it. so far, i have not found any project that matches this description. if you know of a certain typeface that is similar to what i'm describing, please share, so i may study it. thank you.

Karl Stange's picture

Would it not be more rewarding to experiment in isolation rather than be led be what others have already done?

Karl Stange's picture

By the way, I really like the work on your site, particularly the posters!

etahchen's picture

You know what, you're right. It would be more rewarding to experiment in isolation. I think I was just in a hurry because this is for a class and there is a time limit.
And thank you, I'm glad you enjoyed the posters.

etahchen's picture

what is going on with the 'insert image' option?

Karl Stange's picture

what is going on with the 'insert image' option?

Nothing good. I find it very temperamental and it only seems to work in particular browsers on particular days of the week, but I haven't figured out which ones. I use Chrome as standard and that does not like it but Safari works from time to time. I think there may also be a restriction on image pixel size with an upper limit of 500 x 500. You should be able to display images hosted externally though.

kentlew's picture

You don’t get much more Transitional than Richard Austin. You don’t get much heavier or blacker than Ultra. And you don’t get much more fashionable than Commercial Type these days.

http://commercialtype.com/typefaces/austin/austin/ultra

Nick Shinn's picture

In an educational context, I would say that the first fat faces (early 19th century) and the “Ultra Bodonis” of the early 20th century are worth studying, because the designers of these were pushing the limit of form experimentally. Commercial’s Austin is more about the nuances of style—targeting fashion magazines while alluding to the 1970s (e.g. Lubalin/Carnese’s Fat Face).

Has anybody designed a “Klimax with serifs” yet?
If not, it may be what you should try (emulating the principle, not the artefact).

etahchen's picture

@OldNick, Standing Room doesn't look transitional at all.

oldnick's picture

@OldNick, Standing Room doesn't look transitional at all.

Probably because the word “transitional” doesn’t appear in your original post. Silly me…

etahchen's picture

@OldNick. sorry. silly me as well.

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