For Art Deco freaks …

Andreas Stötzner's picture

This is to be my next release, most likely.

Catharsis's picture

Pretty overall, and I just love the |J|, but I'm not so font of the implementation of the thin bystroke in some of the letters.

The open ends of the thin strokes on round letters like |C| and |O| feel rough to me. The variation of open, closed, and serifed terminals seems random, particularly for the |H|; maybe settle on a single style? The |B| is messy, and the top of the |ẞ| looks broken (though its overall shape is cool).

Andreas Stötzner's picture

The bystrokes have to be open in some places. It shall feel more graphical, not predominantly like a spotlight-metallic effect.
A number of oddities are to possibly add liveliness: different stroke thicknesses (horizontal), open/closed parts, asymetries.
The B is better now, I hope (you were right!).
Now, a first look at the entire ABC:

bartd's picture

To me this looks very promising — a font I would be greedy to add to my library even without having any serious use for it, just for its prettiness. However (and as a layman I find it nerve-wrecking to articulate any criticism) there are a few glyphs that don't quite convince me.

  • X and Z seem in doubt whether or not to look top-heavy like K and R; to me they look a bit unstable as they are now;
  • Y stands out as the only glyph to have an angular bystroke, which I find puzzling;
  • IJ to me looks less like an IJ than as an alternative glyph for U — it would be less confusing with either a shortened I-shape or a J-shape with a real descender (by the way, that curved J-shape would be a lovely alternative glyph for the straight one);
  • Œ looks like an O that comes speeding from the right; Æ has more or less a similar effect. Of course this font does not aim for a maximum legibility, but still...
  • I am not sure if the four different heights of the middle bar in E, F, G and H might not be a bit too much of a good thing; especially the middel bar of Æ being lower than E's or Œ's might be reconsidered.

All these reservations are of course to be taken with a healthy dose of salt...
All best, Bart

Andreas Stötzner's picture

Bart,
tank you very much for your thoughtful comments. I’ll consider them.
A few remarks, however:

> X and Z seem in doubt …
You’re most certainly right, at least with the Z.

> Y stands out …
Yes. But the Y is the only letter having an angular mainstroke, which is unavoidable.

> IJ to me looks less like an IJ than as an alternative glyph for U …
I admitt I struggled a bit with this. You see in the sample that I even try another solution for the lc position (all lc positions will bear smaller caps, btw.). We will see …

> Œ looks like an O that comes speeding from the right …
Oh MY GOODNESS – it does!
Perhaps something is to be done with the crossing bit in the centre.

Now some more little previews.
There will be 5 weights altogether:

The initial views were of the Regular, now these shots are from the middle one, the Medium.

And, last but not least, there will also be some fancies available:

eliason's picture

I like the letter structures and proportions very much. But where those thin lines on the curves come back towards the bowl but then stop is really bothersome to my eye. If you don't want that end reconnecting, perhaps it should stay the same distance from the stroke, i.e. keep the white between more even in width.

bartd's picture

Very nice numerals you added. R has grown a sexy leg. Eng is much improved, too, in my opinion.

> the Y is the only letter having an angular mainstroke
One could argue that the R and the Eszett are other examples (as is the Yen-sign); I think they look better than Y does.

Further thoughts:

  • Question mark looks a bit underdressed without a bystroke
  • Upper case IJ may do, but lower case IJ definitely reads as U+umlaut

Best, Bart

Andreas Stötzner's picture

Thanks again, Craig and Bart.

> One could argue that the R and the Eszett are other examples …

I wouldn’t argue that way. I’d rather say, the stroke topography of both the R’s and the Eszett’s right part is essentially different from the Y. I still don’t see a possible other solution for the Y.

> Question mark looks a bit underdressed without a bystroke

I considered and think, I best leave the exclam and the question marks in that simple fashion. I don’t want them to become too grave.

> IJ …
well, see the new take on it. I also changed the Πand I feel that this solution is better.
I also did a new approach to the zero figure. Wasn’t quite satisfied with it (previous versions in light grey).

Thanks for your kind words about those figures; I found them rather cumbersome to make.
Well, the 1 and the 4 are quite nice …
– In that sample you also see a 1st view of the Italic.

And, as to the narrowings of the bystrokes: there is a shortcoming of rendition in rough screen display, of course. Even on one single machine, depending on the application: you get different results. In the sample below (from the Mac): TextEdit – rather thicky (top); PDF view – more crisp (bottom).
Admittedly, this is going to be a face for sizes rather beyond 36p. And more for the print than the screen.
I still feel that the stroke scheme ought be as it is now.

– Further comments welcome.

eliason's picture

Should /B/ be extended at the middle of the stem on the left side like /E/ is?
That /OE/ is far better.
/4/ looks odd to me, particularly at the bottom where the thin line extends beyond the bluntly cut thick stem.
I think both zeroes work. The tall one looks more "period" to me.
FWIW the /Y/ doesn't strike me as odd in the least.

Andreas Stötzner's picture

> Should /B/ be extended at the middle of the stem on the left side like /E/ is?
Could be … but I want to maintain little whims like those difference.

> That /OE/ is far better.
yes I think so.

> /4/ looks odd to me, particularly at the bottom where the thin line extends beyond the bluntly cut thick stem.
Hmm …

Meanwhile, some more preview:

Bogdan Oancea's picture

Wow, very nice! :)

Catharsis's picture

Nice! Love the Toscana version. The Florida version looks a bit forced, though, especially where the dot doesn't sit on a thin line.

Andreas Stötzner's picture

›FLORIDA‹ …
you’ve spotted the tricky edge of it. The few letters whith slanted parts (A, Y, N, M…) do somehow not fit entirely into the model. – In that version I also changed the middle height parts positions of E and F. Found them distracting in the first take.
There will also be a serifed version:

… and, as release is ahead, two surprises ;-) …

Catharsis's picture

The little diamond dot still looks weird to me in the |N| and |A|. Maybe you could try moving it over to the thin bystroke in the same letter?

The serifs are great! :) But at least in this version, I'd take the opportunity to wrap up the loose ends, such as at the feet of |E| and |R|. It seems to work well for the |L|, for instance. Some of the serifs also feel too flimsy, such as the bottom one of |N|.

Andreas Stötzner's picture

I reworked the serif version. Not yet sure what to do with the diamond pearl thingies though …

eliason's picture

That's looking really nice Andreas!

Lasko Dzurovski's picture

Very nice work!

Andreas Stötzner's picture

I try some alternative with the diamonds:

Andreas Stötzner's picture

Now it is done.
Look here.

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