steampunk

The Power of the Engine

Victorian revivals and inspirations often seize on the period’s tendency toward florid decoration. However, the times were also the final surge of the industrial revolution, a time that witnessed the ultimate development in steam, diesel and oil: engines of all kinds. Engine Nine captures the nitty-gritty of a hard-boned indomitable age, boundless in its faith in the technologies of iron and steel, tempered by half-remembered neo-classical details such as the verticality of neo-gothic windows, and finely detailed finials. It’s all here in the brute strength of the verticals, the blackness of the tight setting, the contrasting delicacy of the terminal serifs.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released two new typefaces on Myfonts.

Eccles is another of our 'Early Victorian' typefaces, a series we started with the Wolverhampton family a little while ago. It might be described as 'extreme-Tuscan' in style but has a delicacy that many other Tuscan faces seem to lack. It's ideal for giving design projects a clear period feel, particularly in design and advertising work. We also see it haveing considerable application in preparing invitations to a certain type of happy event. At the other extreme, some of our younger associates have described it as 'your latest Steampunk font'. So perhaps we'll just have to settle on it having a split personality...

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released it's latest family on Myfonts and Fontspring. Wolverhampton is a new Neo-Victorian face from Greater Albion Typefounders. It's something of an example of starting with a small idea and running with it. This family of three typefaces (Regular, Small Capitals and Capitals) was inspired by a line of lettering seen on a late 19th Century enamel advertisement made by Chromo of Wolverhampton (hence the family name). The family grew, topsy-like, from a recreation of these initial fifteen capital letterforms to the three complete typefaces offered here.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released tow new Typefaces on Fontspring and Myfonts:

Bertolessi, is a Roman face made fun, with a healthy dose of filigree curves thrown into the mix. It's an ideal compliment to our extensive Bertoni family, but can be used anywhere a bit of humour and flair is required.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released the Spillsbury family on Myfonts.com.

Spillsbury was inspired by some examples of 1920s signwriting (principally seen on the side of some vintage vans-good thing they were in a photograph and not on the move!).

Spillsbury draws inspiration from these sources to provide a unique combination of legibility and flair, which echoes the charm of advertising and publicity material from the halcyon days of the 1920s.

A basic range of four display faces os offered - Regular, Plain (not all that plain really!), Shaded and Shadowed.

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released the Worthing family on Myfonts.com and Fontspring (fonts.com release to follow).

Worthing aims to combine Victorian charm with modern-day requirements for legibility and clarity, and we hope, demonstrates that traditional elegance still has its place in the modern world. Meanwhile, for those who our curious about the naming of our fonts, Mr Lloyd our designer was reading Mr Wells (H. G.) “War of the Worlds” recently. No doubt some of you will remember the part that Worthing in Sussex played in that story. Worthing is offered in three styles, regular, alternate and shaded. It's ideal for Victorian and Edwardian era inspired design work, posters and signage, as well as for book covers, chapter headings and so forth.

Greater Albion has just released three new families on Myfonts.com.

Jonquin was inspired by some hand lettering seen on a World -War One recruiting poster. It’s a family of three faces for display work and headings designed to be used readily as an 'All-Capitals' face as well as in upper and lower case format. Regular and bold weights are offered, as well as an even more decorative incised form. The whole family is ideally suited for poster and advertising work, as well as book and record covers and period themed signage.

Darjeeling combines British Elegance and Indian Flavor. It is flared like Optima, with a scent of Bodoni. By layering “Regular” and “Ornaments” over each other you will create astounding pieces of colorful typography. Additionally there is “Regnaments” which combines the two other styles.

Darjeeling is great as a display font, but also perfectly legible at text sizes. Use the ornaments only to add spice to Your design.

Make sure to use applications supporting all these lavish OpenType features like small caps, various sets of figures, fractals and the 102 discretionary ligatures.

Darjeeling has been recently released at myfonts:
http://new.myfonts.com/fonts/facetype/darjeeling/

This new typeface Aeronaut is like Blackletter meets Steampunk. Can't readily think of a use for this, but that won't stop me from admiring it.

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