film

Hello. I've been lurking here for several years, but never logging on. I've gotten great help from everyone here for that long just from reading all the wonderful posts here. So firstly, thank you for being amazing people.

I had a question that has been bothering me for a good long while.

Have any of you ever encountered a typeface in a film or other work that did not belong in the setting's time period? Especially if it just wasn't invented during the era in the film?

Hi there,

I've been working on a new identity for a young Irish independent Film Festival only in its second year. I've been undecided about a symbol I've been working on for it and I remember when I first came up with the idea I was delighted, I think Ive spent so much time looking at it at this stage that it's starting to annoy me. Looking for fresh thoughts on the symbol as for now the typeface being used is Office. I'd be delighted for any positive/negative feedback/ideas..

The brand attributes include, Vibrant, approachable, Current, Energetic - Supportive. The festival is run by volunteers and all funding comes from sponsorship.

Hello everyone!

I was wondering, if anyone can help me with a font that I can't figure out myself.

I'm talking about the 'CHANNEL' subline beneath the prominent 'Z'…

Any ideas regarding the classic zeeeh-channel? ;-)

Cheers

My problem, ladies and gentlemen, is self-branding.

I am a designer / Arabic calligrapher / filmmaker / human rights activist. Since my work is very eclectic and it comes as an extension of my personality, I cannot decide on a way to represent all of these different facets in a simple, clever way:

Need help in identifying this font from the 1980s British movie a month in the country.

Can't seem to find it anywhere, any help you guys can give would be greatly appreciated.

Please see attached screenshot for a sample.

The Ks are very distinctive.

My hunch is that film titles like these were created by hand – or at least modelled after something...
But just in case this is actually a known face, I'll post it here.
Some more examples here

See attachment, as well.
The closest I was able to find was something like this

Fictional magazine covers from Blade Runner... as shown in the blade runner bonus feature "Signs of the Times: Graphic Design". The covers were created by production illustrator Tom Southwell in 1980-1981 and appeared in the background on a magazine stand in the city streets.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sbwoodside/sets/72157621762437297/detail/

The original 101 Dalmations film has a lovely script typeface (see attached image)

Anyone know what it is?

Following the highly successful Critical Tensions conference last November, St Bride Foundation is pleased to welcome Timo Arnall and friends to enlighten us about their work with design studio BERG.

A growing and significant amount of design work takes place in systems, software and electronics. But these technologies are increasingly abstracted and black-boxed, so how can designers engage with these things meaningfully? How might we be involved in developing, critiquing and reflecting upon complex, opaque and invisible technologies?

Over the last four years BERG have produced a series of films exploring and explaining emerging technologies, building models and materials for understanding and invention.

I am posting to let everyone know that we are working with filmmaker Scott Hutcheson to produce a documentary film about the world's most controversial font, Comic Sans. The font's designer Vincent Connare has said, "If you love it, you don't know much about typography. If you hate it, you don't know much about typography, either, and you should get another hobby." We agree with the first part of that statement. For nearly ten years now, our hobby has been hating on Comic Sans with the ban comic sans campaign.

In the vein of the Helvetica film, Hutcheson will explore the world's love/hate relationship with Comic Sans by interviewing top designers including Shepard Fairey, designer of the iconic Obama HOPE image.

burgboy's picture

Black Swan title treatment

I keep seeing this font around at the moment. It's got quite a distinctive 'A'.

Anyone know what it is?

Many Thanks,

Chris

Hi. Everyone I recently created my first font "Free money". I thought a good way to show it off would be to create a title sequence for the 1931 version of Frankenstein with my font as the main element. Check it out. http://www.vimeo.com/17700228

Please join AIGA DC for a screening of the film Proceed and Be Bold!, the inspiring biography self-proclaimed "Humble Negro Printer" Amos Paul Kennedy Jr. At the age of 40, Amos left his job as a computer programmer to become an independent letterpress artist. We will be raffling off posters from Yee Haw Industries for AIGA members before the film.

For more about the film, visit the Proceed and be Bold site.

Registration for Proceed is now open. Admission for this event is $8 for students, $10 for members, and $12 for non-members. Limited seating will be available the day of the screening, and will be $10 for students, $12 for members, and $14 for non-members.

Joe Pemberton's picture

Linotype: The Film

How does the linotype fit into today's technology?

It doesn't.

I'm producing a film that's centered around mid-century modernism, design, and architecture. The subjects of the film are American designers and architects, and the time period is chiefly between the very early 1950s and the mid 1960s. I'd love your opinions and your help in researching period- and genre-appropriate directions to take my onscreen titles. More info inside.

Would like help identifying this typeface. I realize this is possibly a custom typeface, but if that is the case, any suggestions for a typeface this may be based on?

Curious if anybody knows this type, or stuff similar to it with the same vintage styling.

Thanks in advance!

Hello everyone,

I'm really keen to find out what font Goddard used in his titles to Bande Á Part. It's quite an unusual but really beautiful, chunky sans, anyone know what it is? The different treatment of the capital R and P make it a bit special.

The film came out in 1964 if thats any use, and a google search revealed sweet nothing on the font front.

Cheers!

Anyone know what typeface is being used for the cover of this latest Criterion edition of The Seventh Seal? I really like it...

http://www.getthebigpicture.net/storage/dvd/7seal_criterion.jpg

Please help me find this font!

Hi, I'm designing a branding for my school project for a Guy Ritchie film festival. He is the director of the movies like Snatch, RockNRolla, Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Revolver, Serlock Holmes. His movies are mostly about the lucky underground criminals of London. I would like to ask which typefaces are going to be appropriate for his style?

Recently I've been trying to identify as many of the fonts used in Disney/Pixar's 2008 film WALL-E as possible, and though I've had success identifying quite a few of them (as seen in this MyFonts.com Album), there've been a few I just can't seem to find through either browsing hundreds of fonts manually or using WhatTheFont. So I'm hoping some of the experts here might be able to help me out. I've tried to provide as clear pictures of possible for each font.

Can anyone identify this typeface used in the ending credits of this short film? http://is.gd/5VG8V

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