Klavika

Hello!

I'm a newbie in a need of some typo advice from experts as I have become overwhelmed by browsing the web ...

I'm a student and currently redesigning a medical magazine run by a non-profit student organization.

I'm looking for a sans serif for headings (it will also appear on posters) and a serif for long texts (2 columns).
Keywords: economical, legible, modern

A friend asked me if I could help figure out this typeface and I'm a bit stumped. It almost reminds me a bit of Klavika Bold, but I know that's not quite it.

(Here's also a larger version of the image if that helps.)

Thanks so much!

— Ashley

I would love to hear opinions from all, especially from the senior members, about this type palette.

It is comprised of Gotham Condensed, Klavika, and Unit Slab.

Does it work? Are their potential traps with this combo? If it doesn't work, why?

(this was just a thrown-together example, so please ignore little details)

Thanks!

Hello,

I've done some research but not sure if I'm choosing the right aesthetic choice. Being a student Graphic Artist for some time now, yet I still have much to learn.

My question, I'm designing a film-magazine cover, contents, and several spreads for my portfolio to graduate from school this year. Moreover, I have selected Mr. Olson's Klavika typeface for call-outs, headlines etc, but I;m not sure what serif face I use for body copy that will compliment Klavika. As of this moment I'm using Caslon 240 I believe.

Are there any suggestions that I may consider?

Best,
Aaron

Helveticus's picture

Body text to go with Klavika

I need to typeset a series of training manuals (life skills coaching). The client uses Klavika as their corporate font. I'm not sure if I should just use Klavika for the body text - it might get a bit much – or look at something else.
The client would prefer to stay with a sans serif.
Any recommendations much appreciated.

Cheers

I'm looking for some suggestions on a (somewhat) techy typeface suitable for an identity.

I've been considering Klavika and Relato Sans, but I find the former a bit to rigdid and the latter might be unsuitable because I recently used it for a related firm. I'm not set on a sans serif.

I've been toying around with the uppercase R in Relato (it has a straight "crossbar"-ish part of the bowl, similar to Auto) for the word mark, lining it's bowl up with other crossbars. I'm not sure if I'll follow through on that idea, but nevertheless I'd love some suggestions on typefaces with similarily constructed R's.

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