typography

Do you know your type basics? I created this quiz on Bloxi about typographic trivia.

http://www.bloxi.com/block/Sfb6oCgT/

Hi!
Can someone tell me what type of typewriter font is used here?
Thank you in advance.

Hello!

Serif fonts often have lighter strokes on one side, I recall hearing a specific term for this phenomena a while ago but I can't remember what it was. Can anyone unravel this mystery for me?

Best regards,
Edvard

Hi all,
I'm working on a farm to table restaurant design. But it will be more than a restaurant, with packaging and food products down the line.
I'm looking for a slab serif that has some light, somewhat feminine qualities. The brand I'm working on has a light feel to it, and I don't want to use a thick slab to move in on that.

I know lots of designers deride archer as overused, but it's still stands up.

Just wondering if anyone knows of a slab serif that has multiple weights that could have similar qualities.

Hello,
my name is Krzysztof Stryjewski and I am graphic design student from Poland and I would like to tell you about my master's project - typeseeing.
Typeseeing is meant to be a guide, collecting voices and thoughts on local typography from different parts of the world. If I receive enough answers, this small anthology will be published and everyone whose text is included in the book will receive a copy.

If you like project's idea and want to help me, please follow the video link below.
I would not only like to hear from you and see yours answers in this publication, but also would be very grateful for any support or sharing news about typeseeing in the world.

I look forward to hearing from you soon.
Krzysztof Stryjewski / typeseeing.wordpress.com

As a design student, I’m sure you’ve opened up FontBook or the InDesign font menu and scrolled all the way down to Zapfino before realizing that none of the fonts on your computer quite match the fluffy type visions in your mind. So then you head over to a wretched site like dafont.com, only to be confronted with an infinite number of terrible choices. What do you do next?


source: http://fuckyeahtypefacedesign.tumblr.com/post/61475663645/theyre-plume-crazy

I'm hoping to release my first font shortly and I'm curious how those more experienced in this niche go about the business of maximizing the revenue created by their work.

For a traditional 3 initial monogram, is the following a proper structure?

Left letter - first name initial
Right letter - middle name initial
Central letter - last name initial, usually larger than the left or right

Does that sounds about right?

long time reader, first time member and poster.

i teach graphic design and typography at a community college in southern ontario (carl dair's hometown, in fact). we are in the process of revising our curriculum and i have been tasked with doing some research into the type design component of our curriculum. i thought the folks on this forum would have some valuable and usable input into our process.

when i was at design school in the late 1980s, we had one minor type design project as part of our larger type design course (15 hours per week). but i wish that i had had more.

so, my questions are :
how much type design is appropriate/useful in a three-year graphic design diploma?
are there specific types of projects that you have found helpful in your own experience?

thanks

Monotype has become the exclusive distributor of more than 100 fonts from Sumner Stone of Stone Type Foundry Inc. Stone’s typefaces have earned an excellent reputation for quality and legibility for a wide range of uses, from books to display advertising. Along with lecturing, writing and teaching, Stone will be designing new typefaces that will become available through Monotype.

View Stone Type Foundry typefaces on Fonts.com - http://bit.ly/1iT4Cns

And read more about Stone Type Foundry typefaces – http://bit.ly/1kvCbHU

Hi,
I'm not a type designer but I like reading and writing on my laptop and, as a consequence, I like good typography on screen. I need to buy a new laptop and I'm thinking about the brand new MacBook Pro 13" Retina.

As you know, this computer has an effective workspace of 1280x800, smaller than MacBook Air's 1440x900, but it is possible to set display preferences to get a larger workspace: 1440x900 or 1680x1050 (so-called scaled resolutions).

What happens, in your experience, when the resolution is set at a value other than ideal/retina? Do scaled resolutions impact on font/image sharpness, cpu performance, battery life, etc.? I love the retina display, but a 1280x800 workspace is just too small for my needs, so I plan to use the laptop always at 1440x900.

Thank you
Manosk

Hi,
I'm not a type designer but I like reading and writing on my laptop and, as a consequence, I like good typography on screen. I need to buy a new laptop and I'm thinking about the brand new MacBook Pro 13" Retina.

As you know, this computer has an effective workspace of 1280x800, smaller than MacBook Air's 1440x900, but it is possible to set display preferences to get a larger workspace: 1440x900 or 1680x1050 (so-called scaled resolutions).

What happens, in your experience, when the resolution is set at a value other than ideal/retina? Do scaled resolutions impact on font/image sharpness, cpu performance, battery life, etc.? I love the retina display, but a 1280x800 workspace is just too small for my needs, so I plan to use the laptop always at 1440x900.

Thank you
Manosk

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

View the exhibit gallery - http://bit.ly/I1uVrp
Read the blog post – http://bit.ly/1hRYiw3
View the press release – http://bit.ly/1edvXeC
Download the font - http://bit.ly/1gYK8b0

Monotype’s Akko typeface is now on “full display” at the Museum of Science, Boston, “Hall of Human Life,” exhibit. Akko is the main brand identity font for the museum’s newest permanent exhibit, which opened to the public this weekend.

What is the future of Type specimens? are people still designing type specimens to go in emails or to be delivered on the door step? Whats the future of Printed Type specimens? are they of any use to type setters any more?

What is the future of Type specimens? are people still designing type specimens to go in emails or to be delivered on the door step? Whats the future of Printed Type specimens? are they of any use to type setters any more?

Typography gift wrap paper

We asked ourselves: Why not use figures themselves to design wrapping paper for your Advent calendar?
No sooner said than done—now available: Typographic wrapping paper for your Advent Calender.

Your gifts don’t need tiny boxes, the wrapping paper offers more amount for taller and other shaped presents (for e.g. wine, apples, tangerines … ). Additional labeling isn’t required for your Advent calender.

Hey! this is my first post! I have already searched to find a specific discussion on typographic 'Niceties' however came up a bit short. Everyone knows typography is one of the designer's core tools. The designer uses type to communicate appropriately, to suggest a mood and a character and to contribute to page and layout dynamics, for both printed and screen based formats such as a tablet or smart phone. its obvious understanding the rules and key facts of typographic detailing will create better communication with the read/viewer.

Good typography should be invisible, yet typography should grab the reader's attention using imaginative solutions.

I'm designing for a take out Soul Food place, but with a healthier twist.
The restaurant will have a graffiti wall, so there's an 'urban' element to it (I hate that word!)

I could use some advice on:
1. A font that could serve as a logo/wordmark
2. Some supporting faces for menus and such.

I'm trying to steer clear of anything too cliche (and offensive).

Any help is much appreciated.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1gKsvu3
Download Japanese Fonts now: http://bit.ly/19RNg5D
View Monotype’s OEM Font Catalog: http://bit.ly/1apiFHF

Monotype has engaged with several of Japan’s top typeface foundries and distributors to enhance company’s portfolio of high-quality Japanese fonts. Typefaces from Iwata, JiyuKobo, Motoya, Ricoh and Type Project comprise the latest additions, bringing the total to more than 500 high-quality Japanese fonts that can be licensed from Monotype for a wide variety of uses.

Hello Everyone,
I lam curious to know who designed the original Azkidenz Grotesk typeface published by the H. Berthold AG Foundry in 1896. Gunter Gerhard Lange was not born untill 1921.
Thank you

Hey guys I've been working on this custom lettering project. What do you guys think? Is the composition balanced? Is this too busy? Your suggestions & constructive criticism would be much appreciated!

It's inspired by this quote... "Wealth is of the heart and mind, not the pocket" by Pharrell.

Thanks,
- Joseph
www.josephle.net

I'm currently working on a thesis that discusses the impact of late twentieth-century technology on the proliferation of typefaces. It would be a great help if you would comment your opinion whether type design programmes, such as Opentype have had a positive or negative impact on the quality of typefaces designed over the past few years.

Download the extension for free and use from any Fonts.com subscription plan – including free plans

Access to desktop fonts and Web fonts to boost creative freedom – yes! Through your favorite Adobe applications – yes!

The Fonts.com Extension for Adobe Creative Cloud allows you to try, install and synchronize desktop fonts directly from within Adobe apps including Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. This extension also works with any Fonts.com Web Fonts subscription plans, including free plans, making it free and easy to experiment with thousands of desktop fonts within your favorite design apps.

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